The Inheritance of Loss

Front Cover
Open Road + Grove/Atlantic, Dec 1, 2007 - Fiction - 384 pages
Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Man Booker Prize: An “extraordinary” novel “lit by a moral intelligence at once fierce and tender” (The New York Times Book Review).
 
In a crumbling, isolated house at the foot of Mount Kanchenjunga in the Himalayas, an embittered old judge wants only to retire in peace. But his life is upended when his sixteen-year-old orphaned granddaughter, Sai, arrives on his doorstep. The judge’s chatty cook watches over the girl, but his thoughts are mostly with his son, Biju, hopscotching from one miserable New York restaurant job to another, trying to stay a step ahead of the INS.
 
When a Nepalese insurgency threatens Sai’s new-sprung romance with her tutor, the household descends into chaos. The cook witnesses India’s hierarchy being overturned and discarded. The judge revisits his past and his role in Sai and Biju’s intertwining lives. In a grasping world of colliding interests and conflicting desires, every moment holds out the possibility for hope or betrayal.
 
Published to extraordinary acclaim, The Inheritance of Loss heralds Kiran Desai as one of our most insightful novelists. She illuminates the pain of exile and the ambiguities of postcolonialism with a tapestry of colorful characters and “uncannily beautiful” prose (O: The Oprah Magazine).
 
“A book about tradition and modernity, the past and the future—and about the surprising ways both amusing and sorrowful, in which they all connect.” —The Independent
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
35
4 stars
38
3 stars
32
2 stars
11
1 star
6

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - PilgrimJess - LibraryThing

"The present changes the past. looking back you do not find what you left behind." Written in 2006 this book centres on two main characters, one an orphan living in the mountains of India one ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Tess_W - LibraryThing

For an award winning book, I was quite disappointed. I read 6/32 (56 pages) chapters and just couldn't finish reading it when I had 11 hours and/or 330 pages to cover. I found the book plotless. There ... Read full review

All 5 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

II
9
III
15
Three
17
IV
21
V
25
VI
34
VII
38
VIII
47
XXVIII
189
XXIX
193
XXX
208
XXXI
219
XXXII
229
XXXIII
240
XXXIV
245
XXXV
249

IX
52
X
59
XI
71
XII
77
XIII
82
XIV
90
XV
94
XVI
101
XVII
112
XVIII
131
XIX
135
XX
139
XXI
146
XXII
154
XXIII
159
XXIV
165
XXV
170
XXVI
176
XXVII
179
XXXVI
257
XXXVII
264
XXXVIII
272
XXXIX
276
XL
290
XLI
294
XLII
298
XLIII
299
XLIV
304
XLV
310
XLVI
313
XLVII
320
XLVIII
322
XLIX
328
L
337
LI
340
LII
343
LIII
348
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information