The Institutes of English Grammar: Methodically Arranged, with Forms for Parsing and Correcting, Examples for Parsing, Questions for Examination, False Syntax for Correction, Exercises for Writing, Observations for the Advanced Student, Five Methods of Analysis, and a Key to the Oral Exercises : to which are Added Four Appendixes : Designed for the Use of Schools, Academies, and Private Learners

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Samuel S. & William Wood, 1857 - English language - 335 pages
 

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Page 14 - I have surely heard Ephraim bemoaning himself thus; "Thou hast chastised me, and I was chastised, as a bullock unaccustomed to the yoke; turn thou me, and I shall be turned; for thou art the Lord my God.
Page 5 - The only point where human bliss stands still, And tastes the good without the fall to ill ; Where only merit...
Page 16 - Oh that my head were waters, and mine eyes a fountain of tears, that I might weep day and night for the slain of the daughter of my people!
Page xxv - With too much knowledge for the Sceptic side, With too much weakness for the Stoic's pride, He hangs between, in doubt to act or rest; In doubt to deem himself a God or Beast; In doubt his mind or body to prefer; Born but to die, and reas'ning but to err; Alike in ignorance, his reason such, Whether he thinks too little or too much...
Page 15 - But what think ye ? A certain man had two sons; and he came to the first, and said, Son, go work to.day in my vineyard.
Page xiv - Delightful task! to rear the tender thought, To teach the young idea how to shoot, To pour the fresh instruction o'er the mind, To breathe the' enlivening spirit, and to fix The generous purpose in the glowing breast.
Page 14 - Knowledge dwells In heads replete with thoughts of other men, Wisdom in minds attentive to their own. Knowledge, a rude unprofitable mass, The mere materials with which wisdom builds, Till smoothed and squared and fitted to its place, Does but encumber whom it seems to enrich.
Page vi - For it was not an enemy that reproached me; then I could have borne it: Neither was it he that hated me that did magnify himself against me; then I would have hid myself from him : But it was thou, a man mine equal, my guide, and mine acquaintance. We took sweet counsel together, and walked unto the house of God in company.
Page xiv - The chariest maid is prodigal enough, If she unmask her beauty to the moon : Virtue itself 'scapes not calumnious strokes : The canker galls the infants of the spring Too oft before their buttons be disclosed, And in the morn and liquid dew of youth Contagious blastments are most imminent.
Page xiv - The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power, And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave, Await alike the inevitable hour: The paths of glory lead but to the grave.

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