The lady's recreation: or, The third and last part of the art of gardening improv'd. Containing. The flower-garden; shewing the best ways of propagating all sorts of flowers, flower-trees, and shrubs; with exact directions for their preservation and culture in all particulars. The most commodius methods of erecting conservatories, green-houses, and orangeries; with the culture and management of exoticks, fine-greens, ever-greens, &c. The nature of plantations in avenues, walks, wildernesses, &c. with directions for the raising, pruning, and disposing of all lofty vegetables. Mr. John Evelyn's Kalendarium hortense, methodically reduc'd: interspers'd with many useful additions

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Reprinted for G. Grierson, 1717 - Floriculture - 111 pages
 

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Page 44 - Innoculatioo, or by laying down the Branches of the whole in the Earth in the Spring, for all Rofes are apt to yield Suckers; this laft is efteem'd the fureft Way, wherein you are to prick many Holes with an Awl, about a Joint that will lie in the Earth, and then cover it with good Mould...
Page 99 - Endive, 6bc. ftrip the Leaves of Beets, Carrots, Parfnips, &c. to improve the Roots ; pull up ripe Onions and Gar lick ; plant Strawberries, and pluck up Strawberry Runners ; extirpate the tall Stalks, and purge the old Tufts; plant Saffron, transplant Lettice for the Winter ; pull the Roots of Plants a little out of the Ground, covering them with Mould, to keep them from running over-hafti.
Page 31 - Inches deep ; water it, and (hade it until it hath taken Root : By this Means you may preferve your double Stocks with the greateft Certainty, and without the Trouble of Sowing, or two Years Patience. They may be alfo laid as other Plants are, but then they are to be kept fecure from violent Colds. Often removing thefe Flowers into different Soils, will contribute to their Worth and Duration : And Stocks raifed from Seeds will abide the I fecond fecond...
Page 7 - Edifice on the other Side the Garden, at the other Corner, of the fame Extent and Form of the Pleafure-Houfe, and anfwering to the fame, as a Confervatory for your fine Greens in the Winter, and for the keeping of the Gardener's Utenfils...
Page 19 - Ames; and when fown, let the Seed be cover'd with the fame Mixture of Earth fifted thereon ; or you may fow your Seeds without Covering them with any Earth, waiting for a fmall drizling Rain, which will drive the Seeds as far as is neceflary into the fine fifted Mould, and very much facilitate the...
Page 78 - Vifto's j where the Quantity of Maft an entire Wood of them produceth, is very profitable by the Oil drawn and extracted from" it ; befides the Ufe of the Timber in fine Turners Ware ; but they furnifh ftately Walks at fome Diftance from your Houfe, as in your Park or Grounds, contiguous to your Gardens, where they make an agreeable Variety : Thefe Trees are increas'd by the Maft or Nuts, in the fame Manner as the Oak ; and almoft any Soil is agreeable, but the Valleys are moft natural to them :...
Page 5 - G thence thence you proceed to Grafs-Plots and Squares, fill'd with the moft beauteous Greens, and Borders fet off with the. moft delightful Flowers. From thofe Entertainments, you advance to a Fountain of the beft Architecture: From thence you come to other Grafs-Plots of various Forms, fine Greens, and beautiful Flower-Hedges; with...
Page 101 - Pots into your Confervatory, and keep them dry, or rather take the Roots out of the Pots, and preferve them in dry Sand, or in Paper kept in a Box in fome dry Place near the Chimney, for they will not endure the Wet of this Seafon. About...
Page 6 - Wildernefs, but might with Facility, and for a trifling Expence, be converted into a moft commodious Arbour ; and that I might be perfectly retir'd, in the Middle of each Square of the Wildernefs, or of two of them at leaft, there mould be a large Elm or Fir, with a fmall Seat cnclofing the Body thereof, and the Ground open in a Grafs- Walk, for about the Space of fix, feVen, or eight Foot, &c. round, according to your Room, having a very narrow and al...
Page 26 - Seed) and to fow it in September, in a Place where it may be uninterrupted, and continue without Removal two or three Years ; at the Expiration of which Time, the Plants are to be taken up in the Month of June, and prefently replanted in good Ground, at a proper Diftance. The Seed of the Sea-Daffodil being fown, may remain ten Years at leaft unremov'J.

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