The Landlord at Lion's Head: A Novel

Front Cover
Harper & Brothers, 1897 - Artists - 461 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 281 - The acceptance of the moral fact as it was, without the unconscious effort to better it, or to hold himself strictly to account for it, was the secret of the power in the man which would bring about the material results he desired; and this simplicity of the motive had its charm." Jeff's morality was fully expressed by his conviction that "you pay, or you don't pay, just as it happens.
Page 336 - she had been kissed as once she had happened to see one of the maids kissed by the grocer's boy at the basement door.
Page 336 - She, for her part, realized that she had been kissed as once she had happened to see one of the maids kissed by the grocer's boy at the basement door. In an instant this man had abolished all her defences of family, of society, of personality, and put himself on a level with her in the most sacred things of life. Her mind grasped the fact and she realized it intellectually, while as yet all her emotions seemed paralyzed. She did not know whether she resented it as an abominable outrage or not; whether...
Page 70 - They may not know it, and those who are richer may not imagine it. They are apt to be middle-aged maiden ladies from university towns, living upon carefully guarded investments; young married ladies with a scant child or two, and needing rest and change of air; college professors with nothing but their modest salaries; literary men or women in the beginning of their tempered success; clergymen and their wives away from their churches in the larger country towns or...
Page 410 - ... what it had been. It seemed to him that a good many other people had come in and taken a hand in making his own life what it had been; and if he had meddled with theirs more than he was wanted, it was about an even thing. As far as he could make out, he was a sort of ingredient in the general mixture. He had probably done his share of the flavoring, but he had had very little to do with the mixing. There were different ways of looking at the thing. Westover had his way, but it struck Jeff that...
Page 1 - If you looked at the mountain from the west, the line of the summit was wandering and uncertain, like that of most mountain-tops; but, seen from the east, the mass of granite showing above the dense forests of the lower slopes had the form of a sleeping lion.
Page 230 - Mr. Durgin isn't one to inspire the casual beholder with the notion of his spiritual distinction. His face is so rude and strong, and he has such a primitive effect in his clothes, that you feel as if you were coming down the street with a prehistoric man that the barbers and tailors had put a fin de siecle surface on.
Page 126 - Jeff's figure which did not lend itself to. . . formal fashion; something of herculean proportion which would have marked him of a classic beauty perhaps if he had not been in clothes at all, or of a yeomanly vigor and force if he had been clad for work, but which seemed to threaten the more worldly conceptions of the tailor with danger« It was as if he were about to burst out of his clothes, not because he wore them tight, but because there was somehow more of the man than the citizen in him; something...
Page 453 - mystery he did not try to solve." Relenting somewhat, Westover concedes that perhaps "we're all broken shafts, here." After all, he continues, there may be something in that "old hypothesis of another life, a world where there is room enough and time enough for all the beginnings of this to complete themselves-" (p. 400). So far as the question of final justice is concerned, Jeff feels that he could prove a "clear" case for himself; and where it is a question of final justice, he may be right.
Page 127 - It was as if he were about to burst out of his clothes, not because he wore them tight, but because there was somehow more of the man than the citizen in him; something native, primitive, something that Westover could not find quite a word for, characterized him physically and spiritually.42 And Bessie notes the same characteristics in him even before he kisses her grocerboy-fashion. "His face is so rude and strong...

Bibliographic information