The last days of Hitler

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The Macmillan company, 1947 - Biography & Autobiography - 254 pages
Late in 1945, Trevor-Roper was appointed by British Intelligence in Germany to investigate conflicting evidence surrounding Hitler's final days and to produce a definitive report on his death. The author, who had access to American counterintelligence files and to German prisoners, focuses on the last ten days of Hitler's life, April 20-29, 1945, in the underground bunker in Berlin-a bizarre and gripping episode punctuated by power play and competition among Hitler's potential successors. "From exhaustive research [Trevor-Roper] has put together a carefully documented, irrefutable, and unforgettable reconstruction of the last days in April, 1945."-New Republic "A book sound in its scholarship, brilliant in its presentation, a delight for historians and laymen alike."-A. J. P. Taylor, New Statesman

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User Review  - robeik - LibraryThing

Non-fiction writing at its best. This apparently started life as an official report of the interrogation of Nazis and other German officials immediately after World War II. The story telling is great ... Read full review

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User Review  - ddonahue - LibraryThing

The epilogue is especially valuable discussion of Germany and politics: industry and warfare well executed by the Germans, but politics not. T-R attributes this the the German tradition of failed politics, especially failed liberal politics. Read full review

Contents

HITLER AND HIS COURT i
13
HITLER IN DEFEAT
42
Chapter Three
74
Copyright

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About the author (1947)

Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper was born at Glanton, in Northumberland, England in 1914, the son of a country doctor. Trevor-Roper won scholarships, first to Charterhouse, then to Christ Church, Oxford, where he won the Craven, Hertford and Ireland prizes. He took a double-first at Oxford, and soon afterwards he published a study of Archbishop Laud. During the Second World War Trevor-Roper worked in British intelligence; in 1945 he was assigned by his superiors to write a report on the death of Hitler, which became The Last Days of Hitler. After the war, in 1946, Trevor-Roper returned to Oxford as a Student (fellow) of Christ Church, where he was a history tutor until 1957, and Censor (dean) from 1947 to 1952. In 1957 he was made Regius Professor of Modern History at the university from 1957 to 1980. In 1979 Margaret Thatcher created Trevor-Roper a life peer as Lord Dacre of Glanton. He was then Master of Peterhouse College, Cambridge from 1980 to 1987, and became an honorary fellow in 1987, when he retired Trevor-Roper was a prolific writer whose topics ranged from medieval to contemporary history. He died in January of 2003 at the age of 89.

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