The last of the lairds: or, The life and opinions of Malachi Mailings, esq. of Auldbiggings

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Printed by J. & J. Harper, 1827 - Scotland - 240 pages
 

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Page 4 - ... belonging, such as peat-stack, dung-heap, and coal-heap, with a bivouacry of invalided utensils, such as bottomless boyns, headless barrels, and brushes maimed of their handles — to say nothing of the body of the cat which the undealt-with packman's cur worried on Saturday se'enight. The garden was suitable to the offices and mansion. It was surrounded, but not enclosed, by an undressed hedge, which in more than fifty places offered tempting admission to the cows.
Page 110 - Providence, if onything in the shape o' a man is evened to you." ' The widow made nothing by this taunt, for the indignant spinster retorted, ' " It would be gude for us a1 if we saw oursells as ithers see us; but if I could hae demeaned mysell to tak' up wi' sic men as some folk were glad to loup at, I might noo hae been in my widowhood.
Page 69 - Behold how good a thing it is, And how becoming well, Together such as brethren are, In unity to dwell.
Page 5 - ... on Saturday se'enight. The garden was suitable to the offices and mansion. It was surrounded, but not enclosed, by an undressed hedge, which in more than fifty places offered tempting admission to the cows. The luxuriant grass-walks were never mowed but just before hay-time, and every stock of kale and cabbage stood in its garmentry of curled blades, like a new-made Glasgow bailie's wife on the first Sunday after Michaelmas, dressed for the kirk in the many-plies of her flounces.

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