The Library and the Librarian: A Selection of Articles from the Boston Evening Transcript and Other Sources

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Elm Tree Press, 1910 - Librarians - 87 pages
 

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Page 67 - Pickwick', for I used to rush through a chapter, and then read it over again very slowly, word for word, and then shut my eyes to realize the figures and the action. I suppose no child will ever again enjoy that rapture of unresisting humorous appreciation of ' Pickwick '. I felt myself to be in the company of a gentleman so extremely funny that I began to laugh before he began to speak; no sooner did he remark ' the sky was dark and gloomy, the air was damp and raw', than I was in fits of laughter.
Page 36 - Twas the manner of Primitive Man! His communal wives, at his ease, He would curb with occasional blows; Or his State had a queen, like the bees (As another philosopher trows) : When he spoke, it was never in prose, But...
Page 35 - THERE'S a little red-faced man, Which is Bobs. Rides the tallest 'orse 'e can — Our Bobs. If it bucks or kicks or rears, 'E can sit for twenty years, With a smile round both 'is ears — Can't yer, Bobs? Then 'ere's to Bobs Bahadur — Little Bobs, Bobs, Bobs! 'E's our pukka Kandahader — Fightin' Bobs, Bobs, Bobs! 'E's the Dook of Aggy Chel;1 'E's the man that done us well, An' we'll follow 'im to 'ell— Won't we, Bobs?
Page 66 - minion' In a 'mask'; I went downstairs and looked up those words in Bailey's 'English Dictionary,' but was left In darkness as to what they had to do with the lady of title. This ridiculous fragment filled me with delicious fears; I fancied that my mother, who was out so much, might be threatened by dangers of the same sort; and the fact that the narrative came abruptly to an end, in the middle of one of its most thrilling sentences, wound me up almost to a disorder of wonder and romance.
Page 8 - ... pertinent to ask what they do when they are puzzled. At this point I might close this paper, and we could devote an hour to telling the experiences which we all have had in arriving at that most elusive object of inquiry — the thing a reader really wants to know about. The chief art of a desk assistant or a reference librarian is — as we all know — the knack of divining by long experience what is actually wanted by inquirers. The fact that so few readers will ask directly for what they...
Page 37 - THERE was once a little animal, No bigger than a fox, And on five toes he scampered Over Tertiary rocks. They called him Eohippus, And they called him very small, And they thought him of no value — When they thought of him at all; For the lumpish old Dinoceras And Coryphodon so slow Were the heavy aristocracy In days of long ago.
Page 67 - I recollect that my step-mother showed some surprise at this, and that my father explained to her that Dickens "exposes the passion of love in a ridiculous light." She did not seem to follow this recommendation which indeed tends to the ultra-subtle, but she procured for me a copy of "Pickwick" by which I was instantly and gloriously enslaved.
Page 8 - ... library, how far can we go in supplying this want in the midst of our routine work? It is evident that we must try to get students, and other readers, in the habit of using ordinary helps, but first it is pertinent to ask what they do when they are puzzled. At this point I might close this paper, and we could devote an hour to telling the experiences which we all have had in arriving at that most elusive object of inquiry — the thing a reader really wants to know about. The chief art of a desk...
Page 18 - This booke contained, within its divers picturings, symbols and similitudes wrought with incomparable craft, the same being such as in human vanity are called proof before letters, and imprinted upon India paper; also the booke contained written upon its pages, divers names of them that had possessed it, all these having in their time been mighty and illustrious personages; but what seemed most delectable unto the friar was an autographic writing wherein 'twas shewn that the booke sometime had been...
Page 18 - I do require thee," quoth the friar, "to shew me that booke that I may know the name thereof and discover whereof it treateth." Then shewed the devil the booke unto the friar, and the friar saw it was an uncut unique of incalculable value ; the height of it was half a cubit and the breadth of it the fourth part of a cubit and the thickness of it five barleycorns lacking the space of three horsehairs. This booke contained, within its divers picturings, symbols and similitudes wrought with incomparable...

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