The life of Ali Pacha, of Jannina: late vizier of Epirus, surnamed Aslan, or the Lion

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Page 255 - We, the undersigned Primates of Parga, engage, on behalf of the population, that at the moment when the frigates of his Britannic Majesty shall appear before our fortress, we will subject our country and territories to the protection of the invincible arms of Great Britain, and will plant on the walls of our fortress her glorious flag; it being the determination of our country to follow the fate of the Ionian Islands, as we have always been under the same jurisdiction.
Page 251 - Greek, in tolerable verse ; i. [See the translation of a speech delivered to the Pargiots, in 1815, by an aged citizen : " I exhort you well to consider, before you yield yourselves up to the English, that the King of England now has in his pay all the kings of Europe — obtaining money for this purpose from his merchants ; whence, should it become advantageous to the merchants to sell you, in order to conciliate Ali, and obtain certain commercial advantages in his harbours, the English will sell...
Page 252 - AllCHONTES. as you do, because you are all free men. But go and present yourselves before their king. If he mean to be the master of this city, let him swear it upon the Gospel of Christ. Yet I would not entirely trust even him. For within these twenty years, Christian princes have openly turned their subjects and friends into .merchandize, and have shown but little regard to the Gospel. But suppose you are once in the hand of England — you may be governed well, or you may be governed ill.
Page 254 - However, this danger cannot last long : for as much as Ali is now old, and his head is always under the sword of the Sultan, whose wrath. though it has so long slept, should it at length awake, no Turk will be abb; to escape.
Page 28 - To my mother,' said the tyrant of loannina, on one occasion, to the French Consul-General — ' to my mother I owe everything, for my father left me but a mere hovel and a few fields. My imagination, fired by the counsels of her who had twice given me birth— for she has made me both a man and a vizier*— revealed to me the secret of my destiny.
Page 6 - ... of Greece, while in the dialect of the Epirots, it implies old women. In ancient times the oracles were delivered by the murmuring of a neighbouring fountain, but the custom was afterwards changed. Large kettles were suspended in the air near a brazen statue, which held a lash in its hand. When the wind blew strong, the statue was agitated and struck against one of the kettles, which communicated the motion to all the rest, and raised that clattering and discordant din which continued for a while,...
Page 254 - The infidels, indeed, may force you to give them battle, and reduce you to great extremity : yet you will slay many of them to appease the blessed souls of so many Christians slain by them. But, once garrisoned by strangers, you will be subject to the will of another; you will not be able to use...
Page 163 - Pasha at this time engaged our earnest observation. It is difficult to describe features, either in their detail or general effect, so as to convey any distinct impression to the mind of the reader. Were I to attempt a description of those of Ali, I should speak of his face as large and full ; the forehead remarkably broad and open, and traced by many deep furrows ; the eye penetrating, yet not expressive of ferocity ; the nose handsome and well formed ; the mouth and lower part of the face concealed,...
Page 253 - Parga is sufficient to nourish and to defend you. Ali cannot take her by land : he cannot blockade her by sea, by which your countrymen in the islands can always supply you with food, and which, in case of extremity, will always afford you an easy escape ; though I, for my part, let the danger be ever so great, would never exhort you to go forth vagrants and beggars, with your wives and children, into a foreign land. Let us all die here at home ; and when no way of safety remains for the city, set...
Page 252 - Nor would you, o men of Parga, — I say you, because I hope soon to lay me down in the peace of God, and be buried by your hands in this church, — nor would you be able to obtain redress. This our city is small and poor, and simple and ignorant: whence then shall it have power, how find money ? and where the learned citizens, who, being sent to the King of England, might show him the truth ? However, this Parga still possesses those arms which have, for so many generations, prevented a single...

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