The Life of George Combe: Author of "The Constitution of Man".

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Macmillan and Company, 1878 - Phrenology
 

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Page 404 - The Principles of Physiology, applied to the Preservation of Health, and to the Improvement of Physical and Mental Education.
Page 347 - We are satisfied that much of the sickness from which the working classes at present suffer might be avoided ; and we know that the best-directed efforts to benefit them by medical treatment are often greatly impeded, and sometimes entirely frustrated, by their ignorance and their neglect of the conditions upon which health necessarily depends. We are therefore of opinion, that it would greatly tend to prevent sickness and to promote soundness of body and mind were the Elements of Physiology, in...
Page 325 - The Maker of the Universe has established certain laws of nature for the planet in which we live, and the weal or woe of mankind depends upon the observance or neglect of those laws.
Page 57 - ... had few other friends in the British Isles. Professional ruin was prophesied as the inevitable consequence of this, as it was then styled, rash and inconsiderate step. But for the encouragement of the young and ardent worshippers of truth, I am enabled to say that these auguries never were realised.
Page 235 - As things stand at present, our creeds and confessions have become effete, and the Bible a dead letter; and that orthodoxy which was at one time the glory, by withering into the inert and lifeless, is now the shame and reproach of all our churches.
Page 347 - ... efforts to benefit them by medical treatment are often greatly impeded, and sometimes entirely frustrated, by their ignorance and their neglect of the conditions upon which health necessarily depends. We are therefore of opinion that it would greatly tend to prevent sickness, and to promote soundness of body and mind, were the elements of Physiology, in its application to the preservation of health, made a part of general education ; and we are convinced that such instruction may be rendered...
Page 35 - The brain is observed to be progressively improved in its structure; and, with reference to the spinal marrow and nerves, augmented in volume more and more, until we reach the human brain, each addition being marked by some addition to, or amplification of the power of the animal, until in man we behold it possessing some parts of which animals are destitute, and wanting none which they possess.
Page 194 - And then he proceeded to the question of religion. The law required that ' the belief of the Church of England shall be the faith of the members of the Royal Family' (p. 185); and this law must be obeyed. But should not the young Prince's mind in due time be opened to changes in progress, and to the probable effect of discoveries in science ? Society, says the Baron, is already divided into two classes. The first is composed of those, who hope for improvement...
Page 325 - ... which, from the nature of things, must most need purification and improvement, may be freed from those causes and sources of contagion which, if allowed to remain, will infallibly breed pestilence, and be fruitful in death, in spite of all the prayers and fastings of a united but inactive nation. When man has done his utmost for his own safety, then is the time to invoke the blessing of Heaven to give effect to his exertions.
Page 69 - The only way of estimating the volume of the brain, in a living person, is to measure the dimensions of the skull; every other means, even that proposed by Camper, is uncertain.

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