The Life of John Howard: With Comments on His Character and Philanthropic Labours

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1850 - Prisons - 495 pages
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Page 344 - ... to dive into the depths of dungeons; to plunge into the infection of hospitals; to survey the mansions of sorrow and pain; to take the gauge and dimensions of misery, depression, and contempt; to remember the forgotten, to attend to the neglected, to visit the forsaken, and to compare and collate the distresses of all men in all countries.
Page 437 - Nevertheless I am continually with thee : Thou hast holden me by my right hand. Thou shalt guide me with thy counsel, And afterward receive me to glory.
Page 437 - One adequate support For the calamities of mortal life Exists — one only; an assured belief That the procession of our fate, howe'er Sad or disturbed, is ordered by a Being Of infinite benevolence and power; Whose everlasting purposes embrace All accidents, converting them to good.
Page 471 - Follow'd thee up to joy and bliss for ever. Love led them on, and Faith, who knew them best Thy handmaids...
Page 133 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Page 344 - I cannot name this gentleman without remarking, that his labours and writings have done much to open the eyes and hearts of mankind. He has visited all Europe, — not to survey the sumptuousness of palaces, or the stateliness of temples; not to...
Page 247 - I have been frequently asked what precautions I use to preserve myself from infection in the prisons and hospitals which I visit. I here answer, next to the free goodness and mercy of the Author of my being, temperance and cleanliness are my preservatives. Trusting in Divine Providence, and believing myself in the way of my duty, I visit the most noxious cells ; and while thus employed, I fear no evil.
Page 436 - We shall soon meet in heaven ;" and, as he rather expected to die of the plague in Egypt, he added : " The way to heaven from Grand Cairo is as near as from London.
Page 487 - Now all these things happened unto them for ensamples : and they are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come.
Page 424 - There have not been wanting trivial minds to mark this as a fault in his character. But the mere men of taste ought to be silent respecting such a man as Howard ; he is above their sphere of judgment.

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