The Life of John Ruskin

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Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1902 - 427 pages
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Page 92 - PAINTERS : Their Superiority in the ART of LANDSCAPE PAINTING to all the Ancient Masters, proved by examples of the True, the Beautiful, and the Intellectual, from the Works of Modern Artists, especially from those of JM Turner, Esq., RA By a GRADUATE of OXFORD.
Page 246 - Thy Father has written for thee." " Come, wander with me," she said, " Into regions yet untrod ; And read what is still unread In the manuscripts of God." And he wandered away and away With Nature, the dear old nurse, Who sang to him night and day The rhymes of the universe. And whenever the way seemed long, Or his heart began to fail, She would sing a more wonderful song, Or tell a more marvellous tale.
Page 386 - And it shall come to pass in that day, that the light shall not be clear, nor dark: But it shall be one day which shall be known to the LORD, not day nor night: but it shall come to pass, that at evening time it shall be light.
Page 195 - These last have wrought but one hour, and thou hast made them equal unto us, which have borne the burden and heat of the day.
Page 131 - Turner their example, as his latest are to be their object of emulation, should go to nature in all singleness of heart, and walk with her laboriously and trustingly, having no other thoughts but how best to penetrate her meaning, and remember her instruction, rejecting nothing, selecting nothing, and scorning nothing; believing all things to be right and good, and rejoicing always in the truth.
Page 192 - I am still very unwell, and tormented between the longing for rest and lovely life, and the sense of this terrific call of human crime for resistance and of human misery for help, though it seems to me as the voice of a river of blood which can but sweep me down in the midst of its black clots, helpless.
Page 164 - I know that I don't make out my conception by my language; all poetry being a putting the infinite within the finite. You would have me paint it all plain out, which can't be; but by various artifices I try to make shift with touches and bits of outlines which succeed if they bear the conception from me to you. You ought, I think, to keep pace with the thought tripping from ledge to ledge of my "glaciers...
Page 218 - Put off, put off your mail, ye kings, and beat your brands to dust! A surer grasp your hands must know, your hearts a better trust. Nay, bend aback the lance's point and break the helmet bar; A noise is on the morning winds, but not the noise of war.
Page 163 - Robert Browning is unerring in every sentence he writes of the Middle Ages; always vital, right, and profound; so that in the matter of art, with which we have been specially concerned, there is hardly a principle connected with the mediaeval temper, that he has not struck upon in those seemingly careless and too rugged rhymes of his.
Page 406 - As the Lord liveth, and as thy soul liveth, 1 will not leave thee. So they came to Jericho. And the sons of the prophets that were at Jericho came to Elisha, and said unto him, Knowest thou that the Lord will take away thy master from thy head to-day '( And he answered, Yea, I know it; hold ye your peace.

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