The Life of Martin Van Buren, Heir-apparent to the "government," and the Appointed Successor of General Andrew Jackson

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Nafis & Cornish, 1845 - 209 pages
 

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Page 122 - I am not positively certain which. [Though he has a " distinct recollection" of what passed in the cabinet] As Mr. Calhoun did not propose to arrest General Jackson, I feel confident that I could not have made use of the word in my relation to you of the circumstances which transpired in the cabinet...
Page 117 - Jackson ought to know, and if he does not, he shall know, that, at the Calhoun caucus, in Columbia, the term Military Chieftain was bandied about more flippantly than by H. Clay, and that the family friends of Mr. Calhoun were most active in giving it currency.
Page 172 - ... liars, affidavitmakers, and shameless cowards. All the puppies of Jackson are at work on me ; but they will be astonished at what will happen ; for it is not them, but their master, whom I will hold accountable. The scalping-knife of ^Tecumpsy is mercy compared with the affidavits of these villains. I am in the middle of hell...
Page 127 - I was entitled to be, but little penetration would probably have been required to see through the whole affair. The names which are in blank might of themselves, through their political associations, point directly to the contrivers of this scheme. I wish not to be misunderstood. I have too much respect for your character to suppose you capable of participating in the slightest degree in a political intrigue. Your character is of too high and generous a cast to resort to such means, either for your...
Page 171 - I am literally in hell here ; [that is, in the vicinity of General Jackson;] the meanest wretches under heaven to contend with — liars, affidavit-makers, and shameless cowards. All the puppies of Jackson are at work on me ; but they will be astonished at what will happen ; for it is not them, but their master, whom I will hold accountable. The scalping-knife of Tecumpsy is mercy compared with the affidavits of these viJ p 2 lains.
Page 128 - I have too much respect for your character to suppose you capable of participating in the slightest degree in a political intrigue. Your character is of too high and generous a cast to resort to such means, either for your own advantage or that of others. This the contrivers of the plot well knew ; but they hoped through your generous attributes, through your lofty and jealous regard for your character, to excite feelings through which they expected to consummate their designs. Several indications...
Page 206 - Always suspect a man who affects great softness of manner, an unruffled evenness of temper, and an enunciation studied, slow, and deliberate. These things are all unnatural, and bespeak a degree of mental discipline into which he that has no purposes of craft or design to answer, cannot submit to drill himself. The most succesful knaves are usually of this description, as smooth as razors dipped in oil, and as sharp.
Page 168 - power' over the 'support' of the individuals who administer the system. He makes and unmakes them. He chooses from the circle of his friends and supporters, and may dismiss them ; and, upon all the principles of human actions, will dismiss them, as often as they disappoint his expectations.
Page 127 - I should be blind not to see that this whole affair is a political maneuver, in which the design is that you should be the instrument and myself the victim, but in which the real actors are carefully concealed by an artful movement.
Page 87 - Missouri question conceals, so far as he is concerned, no plot, and we shall give it a true direction. You know what the feelings and views of our friends were when I saw you; and you know what we then concluded to do. My considerations, etc., and the aspect of the 'Argus,' will show you that we have entered on the work in earnest.

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