The Life of Nelson: The Embodiment of the Sea Power of Great Britain, Volume 1

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Page 275 - First-rate, extravagant as the story may seem, did I receive the Swords of vanquished Spaniards; which, as I received, I gave to William Fearney, one of my bargemen, who put them with the greatest sangfroid under his arm. I was surrounded by Captain Berry, Lieutenant Pierson, 69th Regiment, John Sykes, John Thomson, Francis Cook, all old Agamemnons, and several other brave men, seamen and soldiers : thus fell these Ships.
Page 310 - An officer desires to return thanks to Almighty God for his perfect recovery from a severe wound, and also for the many mercies bestowed on him.
Page 279 - ... chains was Captain, BERRY, late my first Lieutenant (Captain Miller was in the very act of going also, but I directed him to remain): he was supported from our sprit-sail yard, which hooked in the mizenrigging.
Page 306 - If from poor Bowen's loss you think it proper to oblige me, I rest confident you will do it. The boy is under obligations to me ; but he repaid me by bringing me from the mole of Santa Cruz. I hope you will be able to give me a frigate to convey the remains of my carcass to England.
Page 411 - To obey orders is all perfection. To serve my king, and to destroy the French, I consider as the great order of all, from which little ones spring; and if one of these militate against it (for who can tell exactly at a distance ?) I go back and obey the great order and object, to down — down with the damned French villains!
Page 249 - Much as I shall rejoice to see England, I lament our present orders in sackcloth and ashes, so dishonourable to the dignity of England, whose (fleets are equal to meet the world in arms : and of all the fleets I ever saw, I never beheld one in point of officers and men equal to Sir John Jervis's, who is a commander-in-chief able to lead them to glory.
Page 281 - Victory, when the Admiral received me on the quarter-deck, and having embraced me, said he could not sufficiently thank me, and used every kind expression which could not fail to make me happy.
Page 101 - THERE are three things, young gentleman," said Nelson to one of his Midshipmen, "which you are constantly to bear in mind. First, you must always implicitly obey orders, without attempting to form any opinion of your own respecting their propriety. Secondly, you must consider every man your enemy who speaks ill of your king ; and, thirdly, you must hate a Frenchman as you do the devil.
Page 275 - ... on the quarter-deck of a Spanish first-rate, extravagant as the story may seem, did I receive the swords of the vanquished Spaniards ; which, as I received, I gave to William Fearney, one of my bargemen, who put them, with the greatest sang-froid, under his arm.
Page 256 - Fanny, been gazetted, not one fortnight would have passed during the whole war without a letter from me: one day or other I will have a long Gazette to myself; I feel that such an opportunity will be given me. I cannot, if I am in the field of glory, be kept out of sight.

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