The life of Sir John Fowler, engineer, bart., K.C.M.G., etc

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J. Murray, 1900 - History - 403 pages
 

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Page 295 - The vertical tube is 343 feet high, 12 feet in diameter, and about f inch thick, and is liable to a load of 3279 tons. The tension members are of lattice construction, and the heavieststressed one is subject to a pull of 3794 tons. All of the structure is thoroughly braced together by " wind bracing " of lattice girders, so that a hurricane or cyclone storm may blow in any direction up or down the Forth without affecting the stability of the bridge. Indeed, even if a hurricane were blowing up one...
Page 96 - ... considering the great importance of leaving the genius of scientific men unfettered for the development of a subject as yet so novel and so rapidly progressive as the construction of railways, we are of opinion that any legislative enactments with respect to the forms and proportions of the iron structures employed therein would be highly inexpedient.
Page 298 - ... to the centre of the tube, and drilling through as much as 4 inches of solid steel in places. A length of 8 feet was drilled in a day of twenty-four hours. When complete, the tubes were taken down, the plates cleaned and oiled, and stacked ready for erection. The tension members and lattice girders generally are of angle bars, sawn to length when cold, and of plates planed all round. Multiple drills tear through immense thickness of steel at an astonishing rate. The larger machines have ten drills,...
Page 293 - This annular wall of concrete also gave great strength to resist the hydrostatic pressure outside the caisson, for it must be understood that the water was excluded both below and above the working chamber. The process of sinking was as follows : — The caisson being seated on the soft mud, which, of course, practically filled the working chamber, air was blown in, and a few men descended the shaft or tube of access to the working chamber in order to clear away the mud. This was done by diluting...
Page 304 - ... feet, carrying away a dozen rungs of a ladder with which he came in contact, as if they had been straws. These are instances of rashness, but the best men run risks from their fellow-workmen. Thus a splendid fellow, active as a cat, who would run hand over hand along a rope at any height, was knocked over by a man dropping a wedge on him from above, and killed by a fall of between one and two hundred feet. There are about 500 men at work at each main pier, and something is always dropping from...
Page 382 - We, of the passing generation, have had to acquire our professional knowledge as best we could, often not until it was wanted for immediate use, generally in haste and precariously, and merely to fulfil the purpose of the hour; and, therefore it is, that we earnestly desire for the rising generation those better opportunities and that more systematic training for which in our time no provision had been made, because it was not then so imperatively required.
Page 369 - We have many thousands of miles of telegraphic communication, but nothing short of its universal extension will suffice. In the solution of these problems, thus rapidly indicated, and in others which could be easily adduced, we may rest perfectly satisfied that the difficulties they present are not to be overcome by a stroke of genius or by a sudden happy thought, but they must be worked out patiently by the combination of true engineering principles, ripe experience, and sound judgment.
Page 305 - ... a man dropping a wedge on him from above, and killed by a fall of between one and two hundred feet. There are about 500 men at work at each main pier, and something is always dropping from aloft. I saw a hole i inch in diameter made through the 4-inch timber of the staging by a spanner which fell about 300 feet, and took off a man's cap in its course. On another occasion a dropped spanner entered a man's waistcoat and came out at his ankle, tearing open the whole of his clothes, but not injuring...
Page 96 - Commission had recently been .made public;* it expressly stated, that "considering the great importance of leaving the genius of scientific men unfettered, for the development of a subject, as yet so novel and so rapidly progressive as the construction of railways, we are of opinion...
Page 315 - Phillips/Photophane 56 to any intelligent eye the nature of the stresses and the sufficiency of the members of the structure to resist them were emphasised at all points. It would have been futile to attempt to ornament the great cantilevers, and so. to keep the whole work in harmony, they studiously avoided any attempt at ornamentation of the piers, and people would search in vain even for a moulded capping, or cornice throughout the whole work. The object had been so to arrange the leading lines...

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