The Life of Sir Rowland Hill and the History of Penny Postage, Volume 2

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 405 - It is as natural to die as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful as the other. He that dies in an earnest pursuit, is like one that is wounded in hot blood ; who, for the time, scarce feels the hurt ; and therefore a mind fixed and bent upon somewhat that is good, doth avert the dolours of death ; but, above all, believe it, the sweetest canticle is, '' Nunc dimittis" when a man hath obtained worthy ends and expectations.
Page 252 - An Irish gentleman (who had left his hod at the door) recently applied in Aldersgate Street for an order for five pounds on a Tipperary Post-office ; for which he tendered (probably congratulating himself on having hit upon so good an investment) sixpence ! It required a lengthened argument to prove to him that he would have to pay the five pounds into the office, before his friend could receive that small amount in Tipperary ; and he went away, after all, evidently convinced that his not having...
Page 249 - Their terms were — eight-pence for every pound; but, if the sum exceeded two pounds, a stamp-duty of one shilling was levied by Government, in addition. Five guineas was the highest amount which could be thus remitted; and the charge for that sum was four shillings and sixpence, or nearly five per cent., besides the price of the postage of the letter which contained the advice — perhaps a shilling more. Now, happily, the days of monopoly have passed, and Mr. Rowland Hill does the same thing for...
Page 389 - ... world. Under these circumstances, it may justly be averred that my Lords are dealing on the present occasion with the case not merely of a meritorious public servant, but of a benefactor of his race; and that his fitting reward is to be found not in this or that amount of pension, but in the grateful recollection of his country.
Page 252 - ... which chinks it up and tosses it over with a bounce; the housewife's hand which has a lingering propensity to keep some of it back, and to drive a bargain by not paying in the last shilling or so of the sum for which her order is obtained; the quick, the slow, the coarse, the fine, the sensitive and dull, the ready and unready; they are always at the grating all day long. Hovering behind the owners of these hands, observant of the various transactions in which they engage, is a tall constable...
Page 25 - Museum is a small book entitled " A Penny Post ; or, a Vindication of the Liberty and Birthright of every Englishman in carrying Merchants' and other Men's Letters against any Restraint of Farmers of euch Employments.
Page 251 - ... against the grating, like a good-humoured sort of Bears ; sharp little clerks not long from school, who have everything requisite and necessary in readiness ; older clerks in shootingcoats, a little sobered down as to official zeal, though possibly not yet as to Cigar Divans and Betting-offices ; matrons who will go distractedly wrong, and whom, no consideration, human or divine, will induce to declare in plain words what they have come for ; people with small children which they perch on edges...
Page 251 - Here, from ten o'clock to four, keeping the swing-doors on the swing all day, all sorts and conditions of people come and go. Greasy butchers and salesmen from Newgate Market with bits of suet in their hair, who loll, and lounge, and cool their foreheads against the grating, like a good-humoured sort of Bears; sharp little clerks not long from school, who have everything requisite and necessary in readiness; older clerks in shootingcoats, a little sobered down as to official zeal, though possibly...
Page 377 - A reduction to about one-third in the cost — including postage — of Money Orders, combined with a great extension and improvement of the system. 8. More frequent and more rapid communication between the Metropolis and the larger provincial towns ; as also between one provincial town and another. 9. A vast extension of the Rural Distribution — many thousands of places, and probably some millions of inhabitants having for the first time been included within the Postal System. 10. A great extension...
Page 401 - It implies the removal of an offence from our statute book and the probable rise of a wholesome competition wherever the service is performed with less than the greatest efficiency and cheapness: a competition which more perhaps than any other external circumstance, would tend to compel the department to have due regard to simple merit in its offices and economic efficiency in all its arrangements.

Bibliographic information