The Lily Among Thorns: A Study of the Biblical Drama Entitled, The Song of Songs

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1889 - HISTORY - 274 pages
In this work of Biblical commentary, the author explores the meaning of the Old Testament book Song of Songs. Written in the late 19th century at the height of the Victorian Era, the author uses his day's advances in the study of ancient Hebrew as he examines the poetic text. The first part of the book investigates the historic character, poetic background and dramatic structure of Song of Songs. The second part examines the text itself on a verse-by-verse basis. The author helpfully divides the text up into five acts and multiple scenes, giving his interpretation a dramatic feel.
 

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Page 198 - The king's daughter is all glorious within : her clothing is of wrought gold. .She shall be brought unto the king in raiment of needlework : the virgins her companions that follow her shall be brought unto thee.
Page 143 - I have put off my coat; how shall I put it on? I have washed my feet; how shall I defile them?
Page 135 - My beloved is like a roe or a young hart: behold, he standeth behind our wall, he looketh forth at the windows, shewing himself through the lattice.
Page 198 - Hearken, O daughter, and consider, and incline thine ear ; forget also thine own people, and thy father's house ; so shall the King greatly desire thy beauty ; for He is thy Lord ; and worship thou Him.
Page 149 - Come, my beloved, let us go forth into the field; let us lodge in the villages. Let us get up early to the vineyards; let us see if the vine flourish, whether the tender grape appear, and the pomegranates bud forth: there will I give thee my loves.
Page 142 - I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse: I have gathered my myrrh with my spice; I have eaten my honeycomb with my honey; I have drunk my wine with my milk: eat, O friends; drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved.
Page 142 - Awake, O north wind; and come, thou south; blow upon my garden, that the spices thereof may flow out.
Page 151 - Set me as a seal upon thine heart, As a seal upon thine arm : For love is strong as death; Jealousy is cruel as the grave: The coals thereof are coals of fire, Which hath a most vehement flame. Many waters cannot quench love, Neither can the floods drown it: If a man would give all the substance of his house for love, It would utterly be contemned.
Page 150 - O that thou wert as my brother, that sucked the breasts of my mother! when I should find thee without, I would kiss thee; yea, I should not be despised.
Page 136 - O my dove, that art in the clefts of the rock, in the secret places of the stairs; let me see thy countenance, let me hear thy voice; for sweet is thy voice, and thy countenance is comely.

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