The Lives of the Painters, Sculptors & Architects, Volume 4

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J. M. Dent, 1900 - Art
 

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Page 158 - Baldassare did two marvellous scenes in the time of Leo X. which prepared the way for those done afterwards in our own day. It is wonderful how, in the narrow space, he depicted his streets, palaces and curious temples, loggias and cornices, all made to make them appear to be what they represent. He also arranged the lights inside for the perspective, and all the other necessary things. These comedies, in my opinion, when performed with all their accessories, surpass all other spectacular displays...
Page 250 - II giusto Dio, quando i peccati nostri hanno di remission passato il segno, acciò che la giustizia sua dimostri uguale alla pietà, spesso da regno a tiranni atrocissimi et a mostri, e da lor forza e di mal fare ingegno.
Page 183 - ... Fontainebleau, where he was loaded with gifts and honors, until, says Vasari, "came to him certain letters from Florence written to him by his wife . . . with bitter complaints," when, taking "the money which the king confided to him for the purchase of pictures and statues, ... he set off ... having sworn on the Gospels to return in a few months. Arrived in Florence, he lived joyously with his wife for some time, making presents to her father and sisters, but doing nothing for his own parents,...
Page 80 - Epidaurius undas: sic pretium vitae mors fuit artifici. Tu quoque, dum toto laniatam corpore Romam componis miro, Raphael, ingenio, atque urbis lacerum ferro, igni, annisque cadaver ad vitam antiquum...
Page 183 - ... friends, and the city for several months. When the time for his return to France had passed, he found that in building and pleasures, without working, he had spent all his money and the king's also. But though he wished to return, the tears and entreaties of his wife prevailed more than his own needs and his promise to the king. Francis became so angry at his faithlessness that he for a long time looked askance at Florentine painters, and he swore that if Andrea ever fell into his hands he would...
Page 183 - Florence, he enjoyed his wife, his friends, and the city for several months. When the time for his return to France had passed, he found that in building and pleasures, without working, he had spent all his money and the king's also. But though he wished to return, the tears and entreaties of his wife prevailed more than his own needs and his promise to the king. Francis became so angry at his faithlessness that he for a long time looked askance at Florentine painters, and he swore that if Andrea...
Page 37 - ... is seen in Raphael Sanzio of Urbino, who was as excellent as gracious, and endowed with a natural modesty and goodness sometimes seen in those who possess to an unusual degree a humane and gentle nature adorned with affability and good fellowship, and he always showed himself sweet and pleasant with persons of every degree and all circumstances.
Page 44 - Our Lady is fainting, and the heads of the figures in weeping are most graceful, especially that of St John, who hangs his head and clasps his hands in a manner that would move the hardest to pity. Those who consider the diligence, tenderness, art and grace of this painting may well marvel, for it excites astonishment for the expressions of the figures, the beauty of the draperies, and for the extreme excellence of every particular.
Page 71 - ... style of Perugino; but this theory was no longer of any use when he came to describe his relations with Leonardo and Michelangelo. Vasari tells how the young painter 'seeing the works of Leonardo, who had no equal ... in rendering his figures graceful . . . was filled with wonder and amazement . . . and gradually and painfully abandoning the manner of Pietro, he sought as far as possible to imitate Leonardo. But in spite of all his diligence and study he could never surpass Leonardo and though...
Page 74 - ... the importance of the flight of horses in battle, the courage of the soldiers, the knowledge of all sorts of animals, and, above all, the method of drawing portraits of men to make them appear lifelike and easily recognised, with a number of other things, such as draperies, shoes, helmets, armour, women's head-dresses, hair, beards, vases, trees, caves, rain, lightning, fine weather, night, moonlight, bright sun, and other necessities of present-day painting. Reflecting upon these things, Raphael...

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