The Lucubrations of Isaac Bickerstaff, Esq, Volume 3

Front Cover
H. Lintot, 1754 - English essays
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 267 - with a real Underftanding why no Body was willing to play with me; I remember I went into the Room where his Body lay, and my Mother fat weeping alone by it. I had my Battle • dore in my Hand, and fell a beating the Coffin, and calling Papa; for, I- know not how, I had
Page 267 - roe in her Embraces, and told me in a Flood of Tears, Papa could not hear me, and would play with me no more, for they were going to put him under Ground, whence he could never come to us again. She was a very beautiful Woman, of a noble Spirit, and there was a Dignity in her Grief
Page 267 - my very Soul, and has made Pity the Weaknefs of my Heart ever fince. The Mind in Infancy is, methinks, like the Body in Embryo, and receives Impreffions fo forcible, that they are as hard to be removed by Reafon, as any Mark with which a Child is
Page 267 - me no more, for they were going to put him under Ground, whence he could never come to us again. She was a very beautiful Woman, of a noble Spirit, and there was a Dignity in her Grief amidft all the Wildnefs of her Tranfport, which, methought,
Page 267 - WE that are very old, are better able to remember Things which befel us in our diftant Youth, than the Paffages of later Days. For this Reafon, it is that the Companions of my ftrong and vigorous Years prefent themfelves more immediately to me in this
Page 64 - we old Men know you are. THE greateft Wit of our Company, next to myfelf, is a Bencher of the neighbouring Inn, who in his Youth frequented the Ordinaries about Charing-Crofs, and pretends to have been intimate with Jack Ogle. He has about ten Diftichs of
Page 29 - Path which they were engaged in, again led them into the Wood. The feveral Alleys of thefe Wanderers had their particular Ornaments: One of them I could not but take Notice of in the Walk of the mifchievous Pretenders to Politicks, which had at every Turn the Figure of a Perfon, whom by the
Page 30 - open for our Reception. We were led through an hundred Iron Doors before we entered the Temple. At the upper End of it fat the God of Avarice, with a long filthy Beard, and a meagre fiarved Countenance, inclofed with Heaps of Ingots, and Pyramids of Money, but half naked and
Page 286 - for his Client, and fo favourably received by the Court, that he went on with great Fluency to inform the Bench, That he humbly hoped they would not let the Merit of the Caufe fuffer by the Youth and Inexperience of the Pleader, that in all Things he fubmitted to their Candour; and modeftly

Bibliographic information