The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg

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Dramatic Publishing, 1999 - United States - 56 pages
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User Review  - ElizaJane - LibraryThing

Loved this comic yet profound story of a town that held itself to a virtue that it had not allowed itself to be tested against. When they are tested they're found sadly lacking. Wonderful humour and ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gbill - LibraryThing

Written on hotel stationary in Europe while he was near the end of his career, growing cynical, and suffering depression from the death of his daughter – and it shows. Not funny, and nothing profound here about the human condition (yes, yes, money corrupts). I love Twain, but skip this one. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
6
Section 3
7
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled throughout the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, Gilded Age in 1873, which was co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

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