The Marbles of Vermont: An Address Pronounced October 29, 1858, Before the Vermont Historical Society, in the Presence of the General Assembly of Vermont

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Times Job Office Print, 1858 - Marble - 16 pages
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Page 19 - ... such offense, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding two thousand dollars and be imprisoned not exceeding one year; and all contracts and agreements for a term of service...
Page 20 - We wondered that the answer of both Houses had not been an order to send him to a mad-house. Instead of this, the Senate have echoed the Speech with more servility than ever George III. experienced from either House of Parliament.
Page 20 - ... of motives, are so apparent, as to require the utmost caution in every word and action that are to come from your Executive, — I mean, if your object is to avoid hostilities. Had this truth been understood with you, before the recall of Monroe, before the coming and second coming of Pinkney, had it guided the pens that wrote the bullying speech of your President, and stupid answer of your Senate...
Page 19 - As to the Executive, when I shall see the efforts of that power bent on the promotion of the comfort, the happiness, and accommodation of the people, that executive shall have my zealous and uniform support : but whenever I shall, on the part of the Executive, see every consideration of the public welfare swallowed up in a continual grasp for power, in an unbounded thirst for ridiculous pomp, foolish adulation, and selfish avarice...
Page 19 - I shall behold men of real merit daily turned out of office, for no other cause but independency of sentiment ; when I shall see men of firmness, merit, years, abilities, and experience, discarded in their applications for office, for fear they possess that independence, and men of meanness preferred for the ease with which they...
Page 22 - I am on my way to Philadelphia!' — to Congress, he shouted. A roar went up, a procession with a flag in front was formed, and the 'convict' was on his way triumphantly. The school children at Tinmouth paraded in his honor, and a youthful orator greeted him with a welcome to 'our brave Representative who has been suffering for us under an unjust sentence, and the tyranny of a detested understrapper of despotism.
Page 20 - Britain, and telling the world that, although he should succeed in treating with the French, there was no dependence to be placed on any of their engagements; that their religion and morality were at an end ; that they...
Page 18 - He in a trice struck Lyon thrice Upon his head, enrag'd sir, Who seiz'd the tongs to ease his wrongs, And Griswold thus engag'd, sir.
Page 21 - He was convicted, and sentenced to four months' imprisonment, and to pay a fine of $1000. Those days of journalism were days of peril to those who fought for a principle, but a revolution was looming up in the future which was to change all this. Shortly after...
Page 14 - The Speaker here interposed, saying, " Gentlemen, keep yourselves cool ; if you proceed much further, you will want seconds." Lyon then addressed himself to the Speaker, and, in allusion to Dana's fiery temper, said that he had in his own mind designated the mission to Cayenne as an appropriate one for the member from Connecticut. A brief and pleasant conversation ensued, after which, Lyon resumed his animadversions upon the conduct of the Connecticut delegation. He declared that they were...

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