The Medieval Expansion of Europe

Front Cover
Clarendon Press, 1998 - History - 306 pages
0 Reviews
Between the year 1000 and the mid-14th century, several remarkable events unfolded as Europeans made contact with a very substantial part of the inhabited world, much of it never previously known or suspected to exist by them. Leif Ericsson and other Vikings discovered North America; European crusading armies established themselves in Syria and Palestine; Marco Polo and other Italian merchants, and missionaries such as John of Monte Corvino, penetrated the dominions of Mongolia and China; the Vivaldi brothers sought to open a sea route to India; Jaime Ferrer was lured by dreams of locating the source of West African gold; and the Atlantic island groups, the Canaries, Madeira, and the Azores, were all discovered. In this detailed survey, Phillips describes these exciting quests while also exploring their closely related myths and legends, all the while setting the stage for the even greater exploits of Christopher Columbus, Vasco da Gama, and their successors.

For this new Clarendon Paperback edition, Phillips has added both an introduction and a bibliographical essay, the latter of which surveys recent work in what is becoming a thriving area of new research.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Classical discoveries and Dark Age transformations
3
Europe and the Mongol invasions
55
The eastern missions
78
European merchants and the East
96
European monarchs and Mongol
115
Medieval Europe and Africa
135
Medieval Europe and North America
154
Scholarship and the imagination
177
Geography in the fifteenth century
200
Fresh start or new phase?
213
Conclusion
238
Bibliography
247
Some Recent Writings 1997
269
Postscript 1998
289
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

The Mongols
David Morgan
No preview available - 2007
All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)


J. R. S. Phillips is Head of the Department of Medieval History at University College, Dublin.

Bibliographic information