The memoirs of Alexandre Dumas (pere).

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Page 125 - And his story is romantic, is it not ?" " Oela va sans dire. The antecedents of tenors and sopranos are always romantic. Their stories are invented for them. It is a part of the programme — like that charming speech of Louis Dixhuit, ' There is nothing changed in France ; there is only one Frenchman the more.
Page 72 - ... me on, have not caused me to make a step the more ; the second, by trying to stop me, have not caused me to make a step the less. Across the friendships, the hates, the envies — in the midst of an existence harassed in its details, but always calm and serene in its progression — I have reached the place that God had marked out for me ; I have reached it without intrigue, without coterie, and never elevating myself but by mounting on my own works. Arrived where I am, namely, at the summit...
Page 75 - Depuis ce jour me promene De la foret a la plaine, De la montagne au vallon. Je vais ou le vent me mene, Sans me plaindre ou m'effrayer, Je vais ou va toute chose Ou va la feuille de rose Et la feuille de laurier.
Page 49 - In the beginning of September there died in the village of Kisilova, three leagues from Graditz, an old man who was sixty-two years of age. Three days after he had been buried, he appeared in the night to his son, and asked him for something to eat ; the son having given him something, he ate and disappeared. The next day the son recounted to his neighbours what had happened. That night the father did not appear, but the following night he showed himself, and asked for something to eat. They know...
Page 66 - ... indeed he happened to have a special object in humouring some vain bourgeois. His tone was pleasant, and in his moments of good humour generally cordial ; and when he took a fancy to have a chat, you could hear him approaching in the distance, humming snatches of the mass service in a voice almost as false as that of Louis xv.
Page 179 - Othello, Richard III., Macbeth. I had read — nay, devoured — not only the repertory of Shakspeare, but that of every foreign dramatic poet ; and I had come to recognise that in the world of the theatre everything emanates from Shakspeare, as in the real world all emanates from the sun — Shakspeare, to whom none other can be compared, and who, coming before all the others, still remains as tragical as Corneille, as comical as Moliere, as original as Calderon, as philosophic as Goethe, as impassioned...
Page 221 - HI was made directly its plot was made. And, in fact, whenever I am engaged upon a work which occupies all my thoughts, I feel the need of narrating it aloud; in narrating, I invent; and at the end of one or other of these recitals, I find some fine morning that the play is completed. But it often happens that this method of working — that is to say, not beginning the piece until I have finished the plot — is a very slow one. In this way I kept Mademoiselle de Belleisle for nearly five years...
Page 43 - My neighbour turned his head, emerged gradually from his reverie, and, looking at me in an absent-minded way, said (in a very pronounced Franc-Comtois accent), " Excuse me, sir, but I believe you were good enough to speak to me ? " I repeated my question. " Why so ? " he asked. " That little book you were reading so intently — pardon my indiscretion, Sir, but my eyes fell involuntarily on the titles of it — does it not give recipes for cooking eggs in sixty different ways ? " " Ah ! yes, true...
Page 33 - ... Bibliomania — The Style of The Vampire displeases my Neighbour — His Criticisms — Further Discontent on his part — Vampires and Vampirism — Nero and the Claqueurs — My Neighbour leaves me — He is Ejected from the Theatre. THE very day of my return to Paris I set myself to look for lodgings.
Page 245 - ... performance of Henri III. Completely unknown in the evening, next morning I was, for good or evil, the talk of all Paris. There exist against me enmities on the part of people I have never seen — enmities which date from the obtrusive noise caused by my name at that time. I have ' friendships also which originated then. How many people envied me my triumph that evening, who little knew that I passed the night on a mattress upon the ground, at the bedside of a dying mother ! what all these flowers...

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