The Mission: Or, Scenes in Africa : Written for Young People, Volume 2

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Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans, 1845 - Indigenous peoples
 

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Page 78 - In the morning sow thy seed, and in the evening withhold not thine hand : for thou knowest not whether shall prosper, either this or that, or whether they both shall be alike good.
Page 152 - ... of the huntsmen issued from the covert, and began reloading his musket as he advanced to give him a finishing shot. But no sooner did the infuriated animal see his foe in front of him, than he sprang up and rushed headlong upon him. The man, throwing down his heavy gun, fled towards the quagmire; but the beast was so close upon him that he despaired of escaping in that direction, and turning suddenly round a clump of copsewood, began to climb an old mimosa tree which stood at the one side of...
Page 49 - ... with his claws. The other hunter seeing the danger of his comrade, sprang from his horse and attempted to shoot the leopard through the head; but, whether owing to trepidation, or the fear of wounding his friend, or the quick motions of the animal, he unfortunately missed.
Page 111 - Diederik instantly alighted, and confident of his unerring aim, levelled his mighty roer at the forehead of the lion, who was couched in the act to spring, within fifteen paces of him : but at the moment the hunter fired, his horse, whose bridle was round his arm, started back, and caused him to miss. The lion bounded forward — but stopped within a few paces, confronting Diederik, — who stood defenceless, his gun discharged, and his horse running off.
Page 123 - The rencounter appeared equally unexpected on both sides, and both parties made a dead halt — earnestly gazing on each other. The gentleman had no fire-arms, and was aware that a sword would be no effective defence in a struggle for life with such an antagonist. But he had heard, that even the Bengal tiger might be sometimes checked by looking him firmly in the face. He did so. In a few minutes the tiger, which...
Page 80 - ... appreciate the difficulties to be surmounted in instructing and civilizing them, will, if they are not led away by prejudice, be far more disposed to admire the exemplary fortitude, patience, and perseverance of the missionaries, than to speak of them with contempt and contumely. These devoted men are found in the remotest deserts, accompanying the wild and wandering savages from place to place, destitute of almost every comfort, and at times without even the necessaries of life. Some of them...
Page 215 - ... river. On the third morning after their arrival at the Val, they set off, accompanied by the Hottentots, to the plain which they had spoken of; riding through magnificent groups of acacia or camelthorn trees, many of which were covered with the enormous nests of the social grosbeaks. As they de scended to the plain they perceived large herds of brindled gnoos, quaggas, and antelopes covering the whole face of the country as far as the eye could reach, moving about in masses to and fro, joining...
Page 121 - ... indignant at the pusillanimity of his comrade, and losing patience with the lion, at last drew his knife, (a weapon which every back-country colonist wears sheathed at his side,) and with the utmost force of his right arm, plunged it into the animal's breast. The thrust was a deadly one, for Gert was a bold and powerful man ; but it did not prove effectual in time to save his own life, — for the enraged savage, striving to grapple with him, and held at...
Page 234 - ... tossed him a dozen yards into the air ! Arasap fell facing the rhinoceros, and with his legs spread ; the beast rushed at him, ripped up his abdomen to the ball-belt, and again threw him aloft. Henrick looked round, and saw Arasap like a jacket in the air. He fell heavily on the ground; the rhinoceros watched his fall, and running up to him, he trod upon him and pounded him to death. Arasap expired with the Namaqua exclamation of surprise and fear on his lip, " Eisey 1 eisey ! " After this tragedy,...
Page 193 - ... credited it," observed Alexander. "The Bushmen skin the. ostrich and spread the skin upon a frame of wicker-work ; ' the head and neck are supported by a stick thrust through them. The skin they fix on one of their sides, and carry the head and neck in one of their hands, while the other holds the bow and arrows. In this disguise — of course with the feathered side of him presented to the bird or beast he would get near to— he walks along, pecking with the head at the bushes, and imitating...

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