The Mother Tongue, Book 2

Front Cover
Ginn & Company, 1900
 

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Contents

Complete and Simple Subject and Predicate
20
The Copula is
23
Interrogative Sentences 1
25
Imperative Sentences
29
Exclamatory Sentences
31
Vocative
33
Adjectives
37
Classes of Adjectives
39
The Two Articles
41
Adverbs
45
Adverbs Modifying Adjectives
47
Adverbs Modifying Adverbs
48
CHAPTER PAGE 22 Classification of Adverbs
49
Analysis Modifiers
53
Prepositions
55
Conjunctions
59
Interjections
63
Phrases
65
Adjective Phrases
68
Adverbial Phrases
71
Analysis Phrases as Modifiers
75
Number
77
Genitive or Possessive Case
80
Forms of the Genitive
81
Genitive of Pronouns
84
Genitive Replaced by an OfPhrase
85
Analysis Genitive and OfPhrase
86
Apposition
87
Analysis The Appositive
89
Transitive and Intransitive Verbs The Direct Object
90
Analysis The Direct Object
94
Active and Passive Voice
95
Predicate Adjective
97
Predicate Nominative
99
Direct Object and Predicate Nominative Distinguished
101
Pronoun as Predicate Nominative
105
Analysis Predicate Nominative and Predicate Adjective
106
Simple Subject and Compound Subject
107
Simple Predicate and Compound Predicate
110
Clauses Compound Sentences
113
Complex Sentences Adverbial Clauses
115
Relative Pronouns
117
Adjective Clauses
120
Noun Clauses
122
The Same Word as Different Parts of Speech
125
Nouns and Adjectives
127
Adjectives and Adverbs
129
Structure of Sentences
131
Form of Analysis
134
CHAPTER PAGE 59 Inflection
135
Summary of Inflections
136
Gender
138
Special Rules of Gender 1
141
Special Rules of Gender II
143
Plural of Nouns
145
Irregular Plurals 1
146
Irregular Plurals II
148
Irregular Plurals Ill
150
Personal Pronouns 1
152
Personal Pronouns II
154
Nominative and Objective Case
157
Predicate Nominative
159
Nominative in Exclamations
161
Genitive or Possessive Case
163
Case of Appositives
168
Use of Comparative and Superlative
187
Demonstrative Pronouns and Adjectives
190
Inflection of Demonstratives
192
Indefinite Pronouns and Adjectives
194
The SelfPronouns
196
Special Uses of the SelfPronouns
199
Numerals
200
Inflection of Verbs Tense
204
Preterite Tense
205
Preterite Tense of Strong Verbs
208
Weak Preterites in ed or d
209
Weak Preterites in t
210
Weak Preterites without Ending
211
Singular and Plural Verbs
213
Special Rules for the Number of Verbs
215
Person of Verbs
217
Personal Endings
219
Infinitive
222
Participles
226
Present Participle
229
Past Participle of Weak Verbs
230
Past Participle of Strong Verbs
232
Modifiers and Object of Infinitive or Participle
234
Principal Parts of Verbs
236
Verbal Nouns in ing
237
Future Tense
240
Passive Voice
245
Active and Passive
248
Complete or Compound Tenses
249
Progressive VerbPhrases 1
251
Progressive VerbPhrases II
252
Emphatic VerbPhrases
253
Imperative Mood
255
Nominative Absolute
259
Cognate Object
262
Predicate Objective
263
Relative Pronouns
267
Gender of Relatives
270
Descriptive and Restrictive Relatives
271
The Relative Pronoun what
272
Compound Relative Pronouns
273
Relative Adjectives and Adverbs
274
Interrogative Pronouns etc
276
The Infinitive as a Noun
278
The Infinitive as a Modifier
280
Potential VerbPhrases
283
Subjunctive Mood
287
Subjunctive in Wishes and Exhortations
289
Subjunctive in Concessions Conditions etc
290
Various Uses of the Subjunctive
292
CHAPTER PAGE 133 The Thought in the Sentence 204
294
Subordinate Clauses Classified 296
296
Clauses of Place and Time 297 207
297
Causal and Concessive Clauses 298 208
298
Clauses of Purpose and of Result 200
299
Conditional Sentences
300
J02
302
Direct and Indirect Statements
304
Indirect Questions
306
Infinitive Clauses
309
APPENDIX The English Language
311
Lists of Verbs
314
Conjugation of the Verb to be
322
Index
325
Copyright

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Page 126 - The planets, all the infinite host of heaven, Are shining on the sad abodes of death, Through the still lapse of ages. All that tread The globe are but a handful to the tribes That slumber in its bosom.
Page 15 - Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end; Each changing place with that which goes before, In sequent toil all forwards do contend. Nativity, once in the main of light, Crawls to maturity, wherewith being crown'd, Crooked eclipses 'gainst his glory fight, And Time that gave doth now his gift confound.
Page 286 - I arrived at Oxford with a stock of erudition, that might have puzzled a doctor, and a degree of ignorance, of which a school-boy would have been ashamed.
Page 158 - The fair breeze blew, the white foam flew, The furrow followed free ; We were the first that ever burst Into that silent sea...
Page 140 - I'll fight with heart and hand.' Our English archers bent their bows, Their hearts were good and true ; At the first flight of arrows sent Full fourscore Scots they slew.
Page 114 - ST. AGNES' Eve! — Ah, bitter chill it was! The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold; The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass, And silent was the flock in woolly fold...
Page 46 - It raised my hair, it fanned my cheek Like a meadow-gale of spring — It mingled strangely with my fears, Yet it felt like a welcoming. Swiftly, swiftly flew the ship, Yet she sailed softly too: Sweetly, sweetly blew the breeze — On me alone it blew.
Page 293 - By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honor from the pale-faced moon, Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honor by the locks; So he that doth redeem her thence might wear Without corrival all her dignities: But out upon this half-faced fellowship!
Page 79 - THE stranger who would form a correct opinion of the English character must not confine his observations to the metropolis. He must go forth into the country; he must sojourn in villages and hamlets; he must visit castles, villas, farm-houses, cottages; he must wander through parks and gardens; along hedges and green lanes; he must loiter about country churches; attend wakes...
Page 82 - Here on this beach a hundred years ago, Three children of three houses, Annie Lee, The prettiest little damsel in the port, And Philip Ray the miller's only son, And Enoch Arden, a rough sailor's lad Made orphan by a winter shipwreck...

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