The Mysterious Island

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Scribner, 1920 - Adventure stories - 493 pages
45 Reviews
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jessica_reads - LibraryThing

This was my first tread into Jules Verne. I was rewarded with a good read. The only complaint was that there was a lot of detail put into all the different mechanisms they had to make. However, it was ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - la2bkk - LibraryThing

I was quite disappointed in this work. First of all, the book is too long. Verne may be many things, but "concise" is surely not one of them, at least as far as this work goes. Next, while the basic ... Read full review

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Contents

II
3
III
8
IV
16
V
22
VI
29
VII
36
VIII
43
IX
50
XXXV
247
XXXVI
256
XXXVII
266
XXXVIII
274
XXXIX
283
XL
290
XLI
299
XLII
308

X
57
XI
65
XII
73
XIII
82
XIV
90
XV
99
XVI
107
XVII
114
XVIII
121
XIX
129
XX
136
XXI
143
XXII
149
XXIII
156
XXIV
167
XXV
169
XXVI
177
XXVII
185
XXVIII
193
XXIX
200
XXX
209
XXXI
217
XXXII
225
XXXIII
233
XXXIV
240
XLIII
316
XLIV
324
XLV
333
XLVI
335
XLVII
344
XLVIII
352
XLIX
362
L
371
LI
378
LII
386
LIII
393
LIV
397
LV
405
LVI
411
LVII
418
LVIII
426
LIX
435
LX
443
LXI
453
LXII
461
LXIII
468
LXIV
479
LXV
489
Copyright

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Page 252 - and decomposed doubtless, by electricity, which will then have become a powerful and manageable force, for all great discoveries, by some inexplicable laws, appear to agree and become complete at the same time. Yes, my friends, I believe that water will one day be employed as fuel, that hydrogen and oxygen which constitute it, used singly or together, will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light, of an intensity of which coal is not capable.
Page 78 - One minute, my friends," said the engineer. " It seems to me it would be a good thing to give a name to this island, as well as to the capes, promontories, and water-courses, which we can see." " Very good," said the reporter. " In the future, that will simplify the instructions which we shall have to give and follow.
Page 73 - HALF an hour later Cyrus Harding and Herbert had returned to the encampment. The engineer merely told his companions that the land upon which fate had thrown them was an island, and that the next day they would consult. Then each settled himself as well as he could to sleep, and in that rocky hole, at a height of two thousand five hundred feet above the level of the sea, through a peaceful night, the islanders enjoyed profound repose. The next day, the 3Oth of March, after a hasty breakfast, which...
Page 57 - The engineer was to them a microcosm, a compound of every science, a possessor of all human knowledge. It was better to be with Cyrus in a desert island, than without him in the most flourishing town in the United States. With him they could want nothing; with him they would never despair.
Page 36 - ... thrown out everything to lighten the balloon. The imaginary heroes of Daniel De Foe or of Wyss, as well as Selkirk and Raynal, shipwrecked on Juan Fernandez and on the Archipelago of the Auklands, were never in such absolute destitution.
Page 53 - The engineer nodded faintly, and then appeared to sleep. They respected this sleep, and the reporter began immediately to make arrangements for transporting Harding to a more comfortable place. Neb, Herbert and Pencroft left the cave and directed their steps towards a high mound crowned with a few distorted trees. On the way the sailor could not help repeating, — " Island or continent ! To think of that, when...

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