The New Glutton, Or Epicure

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F. A. Stokes Company, 1904 - Diet - 328 pages
 

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Page 325 - ... from Disease, Muscular Soreness and Fatigue. (1) Feed only when a distinct appetite has been earned. (2) Masticate all solid food until it is completely liquefied and excites in an irresistible manner the swallowing reflex or swallowing impulse. (3) Attention to the act and appreciation of the taste are necessary, meantime, to excite the flow of gastric juice into the stomach to meet the food — as demonstrated by Pawlow. (4) Strict attention to these two particulars will fulfil the requirements...
Page 33 - ... are not given here.] My conclusion given in condensed form is this. Mr. Fletcher performs this •work with greater ease and with fewer noticeable bad results than any man of his age and condition I have ever worked with.
Page 326 - Fletcherizing settles the question satisfactorily. insalivated, sipped, tasted, into absorption in the same way wine-tasters test and take wine, and tea-tasters test tea. The latter spit out the tea after tasting, as otherwise it vitiates their taste and ruins them for their discriminating profession. 9. Milk, soups, wines, beer and all sapid liquids or semisolids should be treated in this manner for the best assimilation and digestion as well as for the best gustatory results. 10. This would seem...
Page 21 - ... British Medical Association Meeting in 1901, and afterwards to the Congress of Physiologists at Turin. That paper interested the late Sir Michael Foster, and led to Mr. Fletcher being invited to Cambridge, where some observations were made which were so far confirmatory of his claims. In two individuals it was found that complete bodily efficiency was maintained for some weeks upon a dietary which had a total energy value of less than one-half of that usually taken, and comprised little more...
Page 325 - Army under the following heading: METHOD OF ATTAINING ECONOMIC ASSIMILATION OF NUTRIMENT AND IMMUNITY FROM DISEASE, MUSCULAR SORENESS AND FATIGUE. 1. Feed only when a distinct appetite has been earned. 2. Masticate all solid food until it is completely liquefied and excites in an irresistible manner the swallowing reflex or swallowing impulse. 3. Attention to the act and appreciation of the taste are necessary, meantime, to excite the flow of gastric juice into the stomach to meet the food, as demonstrated...
Page 26 - Under his new method of living he finds himself possessed of a peculiar fitness for work of all kinds and with freedom from the ordinary fatigue incidental to extra physical exertion. In using the word abstinence possibly a wrong impression is given, for the habits of life now followed have resulted in the disappearance of the ordinary craving for food. In other words, the gentleman in question fully satisfies his appetite, but no longer desires the amount of food consumed by most individuals. For...
Page 33 - There is no evidence of distress after or during the endurance test, ie, the long run. The heart is fast but regular. It comes back to its normal beat quicker than does the heart of other men of his weight and age. " ' The case is unusual and I am surprised that Mr. Fletcher can do the work of trained athletes and not give marked evidences of over exertion. As I am in almost constant training I have gone over the same exercises and in about the same way and have given the results for a standard of...
Page 107 - ... need of the body for food. The restless craving is due merely to habit — the fact that the body has been accustomed to receiving certain quantities of food at certain hours — and if food is not available, it soon passes away and does not reappear again until the next meal-time; while all posi " Study Normal Appetite and heed its invitation. It prescribes wisely. Its mark of distinction, to differentiate it from False Appetite, is ' watering of the mouth ' for some particular thing." — Fletcher:...
Page 32 - ... pain resulting. The exercises he was asked to take were of a character to tax the heart and lungs as well as to try the muscles of the limbs and trunk. I should not give these exercises to Freshmen on account of their severity. " ' Mr. Fletcher has taken these movements with an ease that is unlocked for. He gives evidence of no soreness or lameness and the large groups of muscles respond the second day without evidence of being poisoned by carbon dioxide.
Page 21 - Certain facts were established by these observations, which, however, are to be looked upon as still of a preliminary nature. The adoption of the habit of thorough insalivation of the food was found in a consensus of opinion to have an immediate and very striking effect upon appetite, making this more discriminating, and leading to the choice of a simple dietary, and in particular reducing the craving for flesh food. The appetite, too, is beyond all question fully satisfied with a dietary considerably...

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