The New Education: A Review of Progressive Educational Movements of the Day

Front Cover
Row, Peterson, 1915 - Education - 264 pages
 

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Contents

Education in the Early Home
27
City Life and the New Basis for Education
28
Teaching Boys and Girls
32
Rousseau Versus a Class of Forty
33
The Fallacious Average
34
The Five Ages of Childhood
35
Age Distribution in One Grade
36
Shall Child or Subject Matter Come First?
39
The Vicious Practices of One Good School
40
Boys and GirlsThe One Object of Educational Activity
42
Fitting Schools to Children
44
Children Need Health First
45
Play as a Means to Growth
46
Some Things Which a Child Must Learn
48
What Schools Must Provide to Meet Child Needs
51
The Educational Work of the Small Town
52
The Educational Problems of an Industrial Com munity
55
Beginning With Child Needs
56
Progressive Notes in Elementary Education
58
Translating the Three Rs
59
Playing at Mathematics
60
A Model English Lesson
61
An Original Fairy Story
65
The Crow and the Scarecrow
67
School and Home
68
Breaking New Ground
71
The School and the Community
72
New Keys for Old Locks
74
School and Shop
76
Half a Chance to Study
79
Thwarting Satan in the Summer Time
80
Sending the Whole Child to School
81
Smashing the School Machine
84
All Hands Around for an Elementary School
86
From a Blazed Trail to a Paved Highway
90
Keeping the High School in Step With Life
92
The Success Habit
95
The Helpout Spirit
97
Joining Hands With the Elementary Schools
98
The Abolition of Mass Play
101
Experimental Democracy
103
Breaching Chinese Wall of High School Classicism
105
An UptoDate High School
107
From School to Shop and Back Again
109
Fitting the High School Graduate Into Life
110
The High School as a Public Servant
114
Higher Education at Lowville
116
Lowville Academy
117
The Schools Opportunity
119
Field Work as Education
120
Real Domestic Science
122
Special Schools for Special Children
144
Playground and Summer Schools
145
Mr Dyer and the Men Who Stood With Him
147
The Oyler School of Cincinnati
153
An Appeal for Applied Education
156
Solving a Local Problem
157
Domestic Science Which Domesticates
159
Making Commercial Products in the Grades
161
A Real Interest in School
162
The Mothers Club
163
The Disappearance of Discipline
165
The Spirit of Oyler
167
Vitalizing Rural Education
170
Making Bricks With Straw
171
Making the OneBoom Country School Worth While
182
Repainting the Little Red Schoolhouse
187
A Fairyland of Rural Education
188
PAGE
189
The Task of the Country School
193
Out of the Mouths of Babes and Sucklings
195
Going to Work Through the Children
196
Beginning on Muffins
197
Taking the Boys in Hand
200
Busy Work as an Asset
201
Marguerite
203
Winning Over the Families
204
WideAwake Sleepy Eye
207
Getting the Janitor in Line
208
The Department of Agriculture
209
A Short Course for Busy People
212
Letting the Boys Do It
214
How It Works Out
216
Theoretical and Practical
217
The South for the New Education
220
Finding the Way
222
Jems Father
224
Club Life Militant
228
Canning Clubs
234
Recognition Day for Boys and Girls
235
Teaching GrownUps to Read
236
George Washington Junior
237
A Step Toward Good Health
239
Theory and Practice
242
A People Coming to Its Own
249
The Spirit of the New Education
251
Standardization Was a Failure
252
Education as Growth
254
Child Needs and Community Needs
255
The Final Test of Education
257
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Page 22 - The speaker, and the schoolmaster, and the third grown person present, all backed a little, and swept with their eyes the inclined plane of little vessels then and there arranged in order, ready to have imperial gallons of facts poured into them until they were full to the brim.
Page 16 - While many years are spent by a boy in gaining knowledge of which the chief value is that it constitutes " the education of a gentleman," and while many years are spent by a girl in those decorative acquirements which fit her for evening parties, not an hour is spent by either in preparation for that gravest of all responsibilities — the management of a family.
Page 171 - BLESSINGS on thee, little man, Barefoot boy, with cheek of tan ! With thy turned-up pantaloons, And thy merry whistled tunes ; With thy red lip, redder still Kissed by strawberries on the hill ; With the sunshine on thy face, Through thy torn brim's jaunty grace' From my heart I give thee joy — I was once a barefoot boy ! Prince thou art — the grown-up man Only is republican.
Page 22 - He went. to work in this preparatory lesson, not unlike Morgiana in the Forty Thieves: looking into all the vessels ranged before him, one after another, to see what they contained. Say, good M'Choakumchild When from thy boiling store, thou shalt fill each jar brim full by-and-by, dost thou think that thou wilt always kill outright the robber Fancy lurking within — or sometimes only maim him and distort him!
Page 187 - STILL sits the school-house by the road, A ragged beggar sunning ; Around it still the sumachs grow, And blackberry- vines are running. Within, the master's desk is seen, Deep scarred by raps official ; The warping floor, the battered seats, The jack-knife's carved initial ; The charcoal...
Page 12 - When but one-third of the children remain to the end of the elementary course in a country where education is such a universal passion, there is something the matter with the schools. When half of the men who are responsible for the business activities and who are guiding the political life of the country tell us that children from the elementary schools are not able to do definite things required in the world's real affairs, there is something the matter with the schools.
Page 133 - He that hath clean hands and a pure heart ; who hath not lifted up his soul unto vanity, nor sworn deceitfully.
Page 171 - Oh for boyhood's painless play, Sleep that wakes in laughing day, Health that mocks the doctor's rules, Knowledge never learned of schools...
Page 22 - The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders, - nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was, - all helped the emphasis. 'In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir; nothing but Facts!
Page 77 - ... if they have been granted age and schooling certificates and are regularly employed, shall be required to attend school not to exceed eight hours a week between the hours of 8 am and 5 pm during the school term.

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