The New Palace of Westminster

Front Cover
Warrington & Company, 1865 - 58 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 25 - The cognizance of the White Hart, of Richard the Second ; the Sun, of the House of York ; the Crown, in a bush, of Henry the Seventh ; the Falcon, the Dragon, and the Greyhound are in some of the lozenges ; whilst the Lion passant of England, the Lion rampant of Scotland, and the Harp of Ireland, fill others.
Page 52 - Westminster has, at least, removed the reproach so long cast on us by foreigners, that ours, the richest and largest city in the world, had no Public Buildings of magnificence or originality, compared with the capital cities of our continental neighbours. The public are admitted to view both Houses of Parliament and all the Public portion of the New Palace of Westminster every Saturday between 10 and 4 o'clock, by Tickets, which are obtainable on Saturdays, during those hours, at the Office of the...
Page 8 - ... prepared a draft of an announcement on this subject, offering premiums of public money, to which they requested the sanction of Her Majesty, which was most graciously accorded. The Commissioners gave notice that premiums would be given to artists who were to furnish cartoons which should be respectively deemed worthy of the said premiums by judges to be appointed to decide on the relative merits of the works which were to be executed in chalk or charcoal, or in some similar material, but without...
Page 6 - Lobbies were used for the first time. At the commencement of the Session of 1852, the first official occupation of the new House of Commons took place, with which most of the public portions of the building were also opened for their destined use. In 1841, a " Select Committee was appointed to take into consi" deration the promotion of the Fine Arts of this country in con" neidon with the re-building of the New Houses of Parliament...
Page 11 - The north front towards Westminster Bridge has bays and buttresses similar in disposition to that of the river front, and the strings, windows, &c. range with those, but there are here two lofty windows in place of one in each bay, the band between them as before having coats of arms, which in this part bear the quarterings of the kings of England between the Heptarchy and the Conquest, (thereby keeping up the above historical illustrations,) with inscriptions of the dates of accession as before,...
Page 24 - At each end of the House are three archways, corresponding in, size and mouldings with the windows ; and on the surface of the wall, within the arches, are the first Frescoes, executed (as wall decorations) in this country, under the superintendance of the Committee for the Fine Arts. Those over the Throne are, Edward III. conferring the Order of the \ rwr Garter on the Black Prince . . . .) u' W- M)PE, The Baptism of St. Ethelbert . . . . W.
Page 16 - The Chancellor's Court, 2. The Judges' Court. 3. St. Stephen's Court, 4, The Cloister Court. 5. The Star Chamber Court. The last giving access by means of a double carriage archway into New Palace Yard. Having thus hurriedly called the attention of the visitor to the principal parts of the exterior, we shall proceed to accompany him through the State Apartments of this Royal and National Palace, although, at present, the public are not admitted to some few of the apartments here described to make...
Page 51 - ... notice the characteristic and beautiful new Staircase which connects the upper and lower Cloister — the latter is used for the depository for members' cloaks and coats on entering from the Star Chamber Court or from Westminster Hall. Leaving the Cloister in this latter direction and passing through Westminster Hall, we shall emerge once more into New Palace Yard, and take leave of this wonderful . building, which, whether we consider its importance nationally — the extent and intricacy of...
Page 30 - The back of the central compartment is paneled in the most exquisite manner. The three lowest panels have lions passant of England, carved and gilded, on a red ground; and above them in a wide panel, arched, and enriched with quatrefoiling, are the Royal Arms of England, surrounded by the Garter, with its supporters, helmet and crest, and an elaborate mantling, forming a rich and varied background. The motto, " Dieu et mon Droit," is on a horizontal band of a deep blue tint.
Page 22 - Throne, glowing with gold and colours; the richly carved paneling which lines the walls, with its gilded and emblazoned cove, and the balcony of brass, of light and elegant design, rising from the canopy; the roof most elaborately painted; its massy beams and sculptured ornaments and pendants richly gilded; all unite in forming a scene of royal...

Bibliographic information