The New Potato Culture as Developed by the Trench System: By the Judicious Use of Chemical Fertilizers, and by the Experiments Carried on at the Rural Grounds During the Past Fifteen Years

Front Cover
Rural Publishing Company, 1891 - Potato - 165 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 66 - Ibs. in the other. But little is definitely known of the special function of individual mineral constituents in vegetation. It is, however, pretty clearly established that the presence of potash is essential for the formation of the chief non-nitrogenous matters — starch and sugar. The published results of experiments at Rothamsted have shown that the proportion of potash in the ash of wheat was the greater, the better matured the grain — that is the larger the proportion of starch it contained...
Page 91 - ... concerned, this worn out soil, that was so poor that it would not grow a good crop of weeds, was more deficient in available nitrogen than in any other constituent of plant-food. Superphosphate and potash, without nitrogen, did no good. They could produce no effect from lack of nitrogen. Thirtytwo pounds of nitrogen per acre, in the form of nitrate of soda, raised the crop from 74 bushels per acre (or possibly 59 bushels) to 141 bushels per acre. The same amount of nitrogen on plot 8, in 1,020...
Page 65 - States, and nearly two- thirds as much as in some important European countries. By superphosphate of lime alone, the produce is raised from an average of scarcely two, to nearly 3% tons ; that is, to very little more than by the superphosphates alone. It is evident, therefore, that up to this amount of production, the character of the exhaustion induced by the growth of the crop on this land, which was, agriculturally speaking, in a somewhat exhausted condition, was much more that of available phosphoric...
Page 67 - ... more porous and easily permeable to the surface roots, upon the development of which the success of the crop so much depends. Then, again, something may be due to an increased temperature of the surface soil engendered by the decomposition of so large an amount of organic matter within it; whilst...
Page 65 - ... cwts. per acre. The better result by nitrate of soda than by ammonium salts is doubtless due to the nitrogenous supply being more immediately available, and more rapidly distributed within the soil, and so inducing a more extended development of feeding root. These negative results by the nitrogenous manures alone, confirm the conclusion that by the continuous growth of the crop on this land, it was the available supply of mineral constituents within the root-range of the plant, more than that...

Bibliographic information