The ore deposits of the United States and Canada

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The Scientific publishing company, 1900 - Ore deposits - 481 pages
 

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Page 74 - Mineral Veins : an inquiry into their Origin, founded on a Study of the Auriferous Quartz Veins of Australia...
Page 486 - Lead and Copper Smelting and Copper Converting, Hixon, 3.00 Stamp Milling of Gold Ores, Rickard, - ... 2.50 Practical Notes on the Cyanide Process, Bosqui, - 2.50 Chemical and Geological Essays, Hunt, - 2.50 Prospecting, Locating and Valuing Mines, Stretch, Library Cloth...
Page 484 - Extremely valuable te -hnical articles by the most competent authorities give the recent progress in each department of mining, metallurgy and the chemical industry, and thus supplement and bring up to date all the technical books. The tables of itemized cost of production of many of the minerals and metals afford information of the utmost value to all interested in the industry.
Page 102 - But they are distinguishable into ores at the top, ores in the middle, and ores at the bottom of the great limestone formation No. II. Those at the top form a belt along the middle of the valley where the Trenton limestone underlies the Utica or Hudson river slates. Those in the middle are connected with various horizons of ferruginous limestones in the Chazy and Calciferous. Those at the bottom, along the north or west foot of the South Mountain-Blue Ridge range, are geologically connected with...
Page 265 - That the mineral solutions or ore-currents concentrated along natural water channels and followed by preference the bedding planes at a certain geological horizon; but that they also penetrated the mass of the adjoining rocks through cross-joints and cleavage planes. "And with regard to distribution— "I. That the main mass of argentiferous lead ores is found in calcareomagnesian rocks. "II. That the silicious rocks, porphyries, and crystalline rocks contain proportionately more gold and copper.
Page 195 - ... giving results of Dr. Safford's work. 2. Tennessee copper mines. Mining Mag., vol. 1, p. 175, 1853. Note from the Louisville Courier. Thompson (John). Tabulated analyses of commercial fertilizers, from January 1st, 1909, to January 1st, 1910. Tennessee Bulletin, 47 pp. Trippel (A.) and Credner (H.) Report on the Ducktown region to the American Bureau of Mines, 1866.
Page 34 - ... the first to form are certain oxides, magnetite, specular hematite, ilmenite, rarely chromite and picotite, a few silicates, unimportant in this connection (zircon, titanite), and the sulphides pyrite and pyrrhotite. Next after these metallic oxides, etc., the heavy, dark-colored, basic silicates, olivine, biotite, augite, and hornblende, are formed. All these minerals are characterized by high percentages of iron, magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. They are very generally provided with inclusions...
Page 41 - Ascensional ventilation (Eng.). The arrangement of the ventilating currents so that the vitiated air shall rise continuously until reaching the surface. Particularly applicable to steep coal seams. (Gresley) Ascension, infiltration by. The theory of Infiltration by ascension In solution from below considers that orebearing solutions come from the heated zones of the earth, and that they rise through cavities, and at diminished temperatures and pressures deposit their burdens. (Ore Dep., p. 40) Ascension...
Page 348 - On the Great Lava-flood of the West ; and on the Structure and Age of the Cascade Mountains.
Page 209 - Kemp has summarized and commented on some of the published views on the origin of the deposits as follows:* "The original source of the copper was thought by the earlier investigators to be in the eruptive rocks themselves, and that with them it had come in some form to the surface, and had been subsequently concentrated in the cavities. Pumpelly has referred it to copper sulphides distributed through the sedimentary, as well as the massive rocks from which the circulating waters have leached it...

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