The Original Works of William King ...: Now First Collected ...

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editor; and sold, 1776
 

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Page 120 - I take imitation of an author, in their sense, to be an endeavour of a later poet to write like one who has written before him, on the same subject : that is, not to translate his words, or to be confined to his sense, but only to set him as a pattern, and to write, as he supposes that author would have done, had he lived in our age, and in our country.
Page 38 - The Art of Cookery, in imitation of Horace's Art of Poetry, with some Letters to Dr. Lister...
Page 65 - ' but my daughter will fliew you the way to yours : " for I know you would willingly be in it." This was extremely kind ! Now, upon her retirement (fee the great...
Page 27 - Let not your noble courage be cast down: But, all the while you lie before the town, Drink, and drive care away! drink, and be merry! You'll ne'er go the sooner to the Stygian ferry!
Page 60 - Drink hearty draughts of ale from plain brown bowls, And snatch the homely rasher from the coals : So you, retiring from much better cheer, For once, may venture to do penance here. And since that plenteous Autumn now is past...
Page 60 - Fops may have leave to level all they can, As pigmies would be glad to lop a man. Half-wits are fleas ; so little and so light, We scarce could know they live, but that they bite.
Page 144 - To make your wife and mine a muff.) Thus he frames wings, and nothing lacks To fix the whole, but melted wax : That was the work of the young boy, Pleas'd at the fancy of the toy; Not guessing, ere he was much older, He should have one upon each shoulder.
Page 121 - en : so, faith, I told'n in plain terms, if I were minded to marry, I'd marry to please myself, not him ; and for the young woman that he provided for me, I thought it more fitting for her to learn her sampler, and make dirt-pies, than to look after a husband ; for my part, I...
Page 250 - Says then the fleering fpark, with courteous grin, By which he- drew his infant cullies in ; " Nothing more eafy ; did you never fee .. " How, in a fwarm, bees, hanging bee by bee, " Make a long fort of rope below the tree.
Page 247 - Paddy Scot, with none of the beft faces, Had a moft knotty pate at folving cafes; In any point could tell you, to a hair, When was a grain of honefty to fpare. It happen'd, after prayers, one certain night, At home he had occafion for a light To turn Socinus...

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