The Parallel Curriculum: A Design to Develop High Potential and Challenge High-Ability Learners

Front Cover
Corwin Press, 2002 - Education - 270 pages
0 Reviews
This book presents a model of curriculum development for gifted students and offers four parallel approaches that focus on ascending intellectual demand as students develop expertise in learning. The parallel curriculum's four approaches include: (1) the core or basic curriculum; (2) the curriculum of connections, which expands on the core curriculum's key concepts and principles; (3) the curriculum of practice, which encourages students to function in a discipline with increasing expertise; and (4) the curriculum of identity, which helps students see themselves in relation to the discipline. Individual chapters address the following topics: the rationale for an evolving conception of curriculum to develop expertise; an overview of the Parallel Curriculum Model; the essentials of curriculum design; the core curriculum parallel; the curriculum of connections parallel; the curriculum of practice parallel; the curriculum of identity parallel; and making decisions about the use of the Parallel Curriculum Model. Each of the chapters detailing the four curriculum approaches discusses the meaning of the approach, key features and characteristics of the approach, content and standards, teaching methods, assessment, learning activities, resources, and modifications based on learner need. An extended example of each curriculum approach completes these chapters. (Contains 75 references.) (DB)
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

The Rationale for an Evolving Conception of Curriculum to Develop Expertise
1
Changing Views of Inteiigence and Giftedness
2
The Need to Explore Similarities and Differences in Curriculum for All Learners and for Gifted Learners
3
A Need to Honor the Post by Building to the Future
5
Theories of Knowledge
6
Selected Concepts From Theories of Curriculum and Instruction
9
Process Development
10
A Product Orientation
11
Why Should a Teacher Emphasize Connections and Relationships?
129
When Should 1 Use This Parallel?
131
Choosing Appropriate Content and Learning Objectives to Support a Curriculum of Connections
136
Keoras Cultures Curriculum
140
Remodeling Examples
141
We Read About ft
142
lntegrating Subjects
143
Summary
144

Ascending 1ntellectual Demand in the Parallel Curriculum Model
12
Student Affect and the Parallel Curriculum Model
14
An Overview of the Parallel Curriculum Model
17
A Look at the Four Curriculum Parallels
19
The Nature of the Effective Core Curriculum
20
Ascending lntellectual Demand and the Core Curriculum
21
CloseUps of the Core Curriculum
22
The Nature of the Curriculum of Connections
23
Ascending lntellectual Demand and the Curriculum of Connections
25
CloseUps of the Curriculum of Connections
26
The Nature of the Curriculum of Practice
28
Ascending Intellectual Demand and the Curriculum of Practice
31
CloseUps of the Curriculum of Practice
32
The Nature of the Curriculum of ldentity
35
Ascending lntellectual Demand and the Curriculum of ldentity
38
CloseUps of the Curriculum of ldentity
40
A Curriculum Combining Parallels
41
Looking Ahead in the Book
42
The Essentials of Curriculum Design
43
Components of a Comprehensive Curriculum Plan
45
1 ContentStandards
48
3 lntroductory Activities
52
4 Teaching Methods
53
5 Learning Activities
56
6 Grouping Strategies
60
7 Products
61
9 Extension Activities
63
10 Modifications Based on Learner Need
64
A Capsule of Components of Comprehensive Curriculum
65
Comprehensive Curriculum Framework One Teachers Approaches
67
Revising the Teachers Guide Assessment
70
Planning the lntroduction to the Unit
72
Finding Resources for the Unit
76
Developing Products for the Unit
77
Modifying Basic Plans in Response to Learner Needs
78
Looking Back and Ahead
79
The Core Curriculum Parallel
81
Why Four Approaches to Curriculum Design? 1snt One Good Enough?
82
Form Follows Function
83
Architectural Design
84
What Is Core in the Core Curriculum Parallel?
85
What Is the Purpose of the Core Curriculum Parallel?
86
How Are the Key Curriculum Components Reconfigured to Achieve the Goals of the Core Curriculum Parallel?
88
Assessment Strategies and the Core Curriculum Parallel
94
Introductory Activities in the Core Curriculum Parallel
97
Revising the Remaining Curriculum Components to Address the Goals of the Core Curriculum Parallel
99
Teaching Methods and the Core Curriculum Parallel
100
Learning Activities and the Core Curriculum Parallel
101
Resources in the Core Curriculum Parallel
102
Core Curriculum Parallel
103
Modification for Learner Need and Ascending lntellectual Demand in the Core Curriculum Parallel
105
Determining Content
106
Planning Assessment Strategies
115
Planning Introductory Activities
116
Selecting Teaching and Learning Activities Grouping Strategies Resources and Products
118
Choosing Extension Activities
121
Modifying Plans Based on Learner Need lncluding Ascending lntellectual Demand
122
Looking Back and Ahead
123
of Connections Parallel
125
What 1s the Curriculum of Connections?
127
Focusing Questions in the Curriculum of Connections
128
Introductory Activities in a Curriculum of Connections
146
Teaching Strategies in a Curriculum of Connections
147
Learning Activities in a Curriculum of Connections
148
Products Grouping Strategies and Extension Activities in the Curriculum of Connections
149
Differentiation and Ascending fnteffectuaf Demand in the Curriculum of Connections
150
Resources
154
Blending Content Decisions and Grouping Strategies
155
Teaching Methods and Learning Activities
156
Student Products and Assessments
157
Introductory Activities
158
Modifications in Response to Learner Need lncluding Ascending lntellectual Demand
159
Lydias Reflections
160
Looking Back and Ahead
161
The Curriculum of Practice Parallel
163
What Does 1t Mean to Practice in a Curriculum?
164
Why Does It Matter to Have Students Engage in a Curriculum of Practice?
166
Key Features of the Key Components of Curriculum in the Curriculum of Practice
173
Assessment in the Curriculum of Practice
178
lntroductory Activities and the Curriculum of Practice
179
Learning Activities and the Curriculum of Practice
180
An Example of Simulating the Role of an Expert Practitioner
181
An Example of Becoming Expert Practitioners in a Field of Study
184
Resources in the Curriculum of Practice
185
Extension Activities in the Curriculum of Practice
187
Student Grouping in the Curriculum of Practice
188
Modifications Based on Learner Need lncluding Ascending lntellectual Demand
190
Summary
191
An Example of the Curriculum of Practice
192
Gathering the Resources
194
Developing Extension Activities
198
Planning for Student Grouping
205
Looking Back and Ahead
207
The Curriculum of Identity Parallel
209
What Does 1dentity Mean in the Curriculum of Identity?
210
Why Should We Be Concerned About a Students Identity?
212
What Are the Key Features and Characteristics of Curriculum Components Within the Curriculum of Identity?
214
ContentStandards in the Curriculum of ldentity
215
2 Assessments in the Curriculum of ldentity
221
3 Introductory Activities in the Curriculum of ldentity
225
4 Teaching Methods in the Curriculum of ldentity
228
5 Learning Activities in the Curriculum of ldentity
229
6 Grouping Strategies in the Curriculum of identity
230
7 Resources in the Curriculum of ldentity
231
8 Products in the Curriculum of ldentity
232
Ascending lntellectual Demand in the Curriculum of ldentity
233
An Example of the Curriculum of Identity
235
Adapting the Components of the Curriculum of ldentity Based on Learner Need lncluding Ascending lntellectual Demand
247
Looking Back and Ahead
249
Making Decisions About the Use of the Parallel Curriculum Model
251
Flexible Options for Using the Parallel Curriculum Model
252
Parallels to Build From a Common Foundation
253
A Layered Approach to Using the Parallels
254
Using the Parallels for Varied Purposes Within a Singie Unit
255
Designing lndividual Learning Pathways Using the Parallel Curriculum Model
258
Extending Your Options Using the Parallels
260
The Nature of the Students
261
The Nature of the Teacher
262
Teaching the Curriculum
263
Looking Back and Looking Ahead
264
References
267
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2002)

Carol Ann Tomlinson‘s career as an educator includes 21 years as a public school teacher. She taught in high school, preschool, and middle school, and worked with heterogeneous classes as well as special classes for students identified as gifted and students with learning difficulties. Her public school career also included 12 years as a program administrator of special services for advanced and struggling learners. She was Virginia’s Teacher of the Year in 1974. She is professor of educational leadership, foundations, and policy at the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education; a researcher for the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented; a codirector of the University of Virginia’s Summer Institute on Academic Diversity; and president of the National Association for Gifted Children. Special interests throughout her career have included curriculum and instruction for advanced learners and struggling learners, effective instruction in heterogeneous settings, and bridging the fields of general education and gifted education. She is author of over 100 articles, book chapters, books, and other professional development materials, including How to Differentiate Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms, The Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the Needs of All Learners, Leadership for Differentiated Schools and Classrooms, the facilitator’s guide for the video staff development sets called Differentiating Instruction, and At Work in the Differentiated Classroom, as well as a professional inquiry kit on differentiation. She works throughout the United States and abroad with teachers whose goal is to develop more responsive heterogeneous classrooms.

Sandra N. Kaplan has been a teacher and administrator of gifted programs in an urban school district in California. Currently, she is clinical professor in learning and instruction at the University of Southern California’s Rossier School of Education. She has authored articles and books on the nature and scope of differentiated curriculum for gifted students. Her primary area of concern is modifying the core and differentiated curriculum to meet the needs of inner-city, urban, gifted learners. She is a past president of the California Association for the Gifted (CAG) and the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC). She has been nationally recognized for her contributions to gifted education.

Joseph S. Renzulli is professor of educational psychology at the University of Connecticut, where he also serves as director of the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented. His research has focused on the identification and development of creativity and giftedness in young people and on organizational models and curricular strategies for total school improvement. A focus of his work has been on applying the strategies of gifted education to the improvement of learning for all students. He is a fellow in the American Psychological Association and was a consultant to the White House Task Force on Education of the Gifted and Talented. He was recently designated a Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor at the University of Connecticut. Although he has obtained more than $20 million in research grants, he lists as his proudest professional accomplishments the UConn Mentor Connection program for gifted young students and the summer Confratute program at UConn, which began in 1978 and has served thousands of teachers and administrators from around the world.

Jeanne H. Purcell is the consultant to the Connecticut State Department of Education for gifted and talented education. She is also director of UConn Mentor Connection, a nationally recognized summer mentorship program for talented teenagers that is part of the NEAG Center for Talent Development at the University of Connecticut. Prior to her work at the State Department of Connecticut, she was an administrator for Rocky Hill Public Schools (CT); a program specialist with the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, where she worked collaboratively with other researchers on national issues related to high-achieving young people; an instructor of Teaching the Talented, a graduate-level program in gifted education; and a staff developer to school districts across the country and Canada. She has been an English teacher, community service coordinator, and teacher of the gifted, K-12, for 18 years in Connecticut school districts and has published many articles that have appeared in Educational Leadership, Gifted Child Quarterly, Roeper Review, Educational and Psychological Measurement, National Association of Secondary School Principals’ Bulletin, Our Children: The National PTA Magazine, Parenting for High Potential, and Journal for the Education of the Gifted. She is active in the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) and serves on the Awards Committee and the Curriculum Committee of NAGC, for which she is the co-chair for the annual Curriculum Awards Competition.

Jann Leppien served as a gifted and talented coordinator in Montana prior to attending the University of Connecticut, where she earned her doctorate in gifted education and worked as a research assistant at the National Research Center for the Gifted and Talented. She has been a teacher for 24 years, spending 14 of those years working as a classroom teacher, enrichment specialist, and coordinator of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model in Montana. She is past president of the Montana Association for Gifted and Talented Education. Currently, she is an associate professor in the School of Education at the University of Great Falls in Montana. Leppien teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in gifted education, educational research, curriculum and assessment, creativity, and methods courses in math, science, and social studies. Her research interests include teacher collaboration, curriculum design, underachievement, and planning instruction for advanced learners. Leppien works as a consultant to teachers in the field of gifted education and as a national trainer for the Talents Unlimited Program. She is coauthor of The Multiple Menu Model: A Parallel Guide for Developing Differentiated Curriculum. She is active in the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC), serving as a board member and newsletter editor of the Curriculum Division, and a board member of the Association for the Education of Gifted Underachieving Students.

Deborah E. Burns began her teaching career in 1973 as a Title I reading and mathematics teacher in a rural K-8 school in Michigan. She has worked as a K-8 classroom teacher, as a middle school language arts specialist, and as a program coordinator for a seven-district consortium. She has taught in preschool, summer, and Saturday programs, in resource rooms, a psychiatric ward, an orphanage, and at the university level. She has written grants, professional development modules, journal articles, assessments, program evaluations, curriculum units, and three books. She has also designed and implemented classroom-based research studies and conducted program and teacher evaluations. For the past 15 years, she has been employed by the University of Connecticut’s NEAG School of Education as a program director, an assistant professor, a research scientist, associate professor in residence, and most recently in Cheshire as curriculum coordinator for the district. She is an active member of the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) and has been a board member for the past five years. She is a member of the Curriculum Division and is co-chair of the annual Curriculum Awards Competition. Burns earned her bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Michigan State University in 1973. She pursued her graduate studies at Western Michigan University in clinical reading instruction and received her MEd from Ashland College in 1978 in remedial reading, administration, and supervision. She pursued additional graduate studies at Ohio State University involving administration, special education, and gifted education and received her PhD in educational psychology and gifted education from the University of Connecticut in 1987.

Bibliographic information