The Philosophy of Housekeeping ...

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S.M. Betts & Company, 1859 - 524 pages
 

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Page 177 - And they came unto the brook of Eshcol, and cut down from thence a branch with one cluster of grapes, and they bare it between two upon a staff; and they brought of the pomegranates, and of the figs.
Page 98 - Heaven." 330 So saying, with dispatchful looks in haste She turns, on hospitable thoughts intent What choice to choose for delicacy best, What order so contrived as not to mix Tastes, not well joined, inelegant, but bring Taste after taste upheld with kindliest change...
Page 39 - Fixed oil or fat is more difficult of digestion, and more obnoxious to the etomach, than any other alimentary principle. Indeed, in some more or less obvious or concealed form, I believe it will be found the offending ingredient in nine-tenths of the dishes which disturb weak stomachs.
Page 498 - Milk, * a quarter of a pound of Butter rubbed into your Flour very fine, — then make your Dough the same as for French Rolls, &c. ; — let it stand half an hour, then make up your Cakes, and put them on tins : — when they have stood to rise, bake them in a quick oven. Care should be taken never to put your Yeast to Water or Milk too hot or too cold, as either extreme will destroy the fermentation. In Summer it should be lukewarm, — in Winter a little warmer, — and in very cold weather, warmer...
Page 79 - ... organized tissues by incessant motion, in order to furnish the matter necessary for respiration, so, the savage, for the very same object, is forced to make the most laborious exertions, and go through a...
Page 505 - Beat up the yolks of five eggs, mix into them six ounces of pounded sugar, put these into a stewpan ; take the vanilla out of the milk, which add to the eggs, mix them well, and stir the custard over the fire till it thickens, but do not let it boil. Strain it into a bowl; when nearly cold add a glass of noyeau or maraschino ; keep stirring it, and when on the point of setting add...
Page 177 - And they told him, and said, We came unto the land whither thou sentest us, and surely it floweth with milk and honey ; and this is the fruit of it.
Page 249 - ... occasionally taking off the cover, and scraping down with a long spoon the cream that sticks to the sides. When it is well frozen, transfer it to a mould ; surround it with fresh salt and ice, and then freeze it over again. If you wish to...
Page 227 - It lias proved to me of great benefit. 1 came west twelve years ago, under sentence of speedy death from one of New England's best physicians, yet now rejoice in perfect health restored. More than to all other causes I attribute the change to the interesting occupation which has kept me so much of the time in the open air, and paid me for being there. I most heartily recommend it to others, who are seeking either health or a pleasant and profitable employment.
Page 499 - TAKE half a pound of cleaned and dried currants, the same quantity of dried and sifted flour, a quarter of a pound of pounded sugar, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, four yolks, and three whites of eggs, both well beaten, and a little grated nutmeg or pounded cinnamon ; then beat the butter to a cream ; add the sugar, and then the eggs and the flour ; beat these well for twenty minutes, mix in the currants and the grated nutmeg. Drop the cakes in a round form upon buttered paper, or bake them...

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