The Plots of Some of the Most Famous Old English Plays: With Index of the Principal Characters

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Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh, 1888 - English drama - 117 pages
 

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Page 11 - Cut is the branch that might have grown full straight, And burned is Apollo's laurel bough, That sometime grew within this learned man. Faustus is gone ; regard his hellish fall, Whose fiendful fortune may exhort the wise, Only to wonder at unlawful things, Whose deepness doth entice such forward wits To practise more than heavenly power permits.
Page 56 - Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned, Nor hell a fury like a woman scorned.
Page 40 - I much hope it. These were your father's words : " If e'er my son Follow the war, tell him it is a school Where all the principles tending to honour Are taught, if truly followed...
Page 55 - And shoot a chillness to my trembling heart. Give me thy hand, and let me hear thy voice; Nay, quickly speak to me, and let me hear Thy voice — my own affrights me with its echoes.
Page 60 - How amiable is every hour of her conduct! What a vile opinion have I had of the whole sex for these ten years past, which this sensible creature has recovered in less than one ! Such a companion, sure, might compensate all the irksome...
Page 63 - Sister, to your unerring virtue I now commit the guidance of my future days Never the paths of pleasure more to tread, But where your guarded innocence shall lead ; For in the marriage-state the world must own Divided happiness was never known. To make it mutual nature points the way : Let husbands govern ; gentle wives obey.
Page 95 - When an old bachelor marries a young wife, what is he to expect? 'Tis now six months since Lady Teazle made me the happiest of men — and I have been the most miserable dog ever since!
Page 78 - Hard. (Joining their hands.) And I say so, too. And Mr Marlow, if she makes as good a wife as she has a daughter, I don't believe you'll ever repent your bargain. So now to supper. To-morrow we shall gather all the poor of the parish about us, and the mistakes of the night shall be crowned with a merry morning...
Page 70 - Beyond or love's or friendship's sacred band, Beyond myself I prize my native land: On this foundation would I build my fame, And emulate the Greek and Roman name; Think England's peace bought cheaply with my blood, And die with pleasure for my country's good.
Page 25 - Well, I'll follow him. Oh, how I long to be employed ! With change of voice, these scars, and many an oath, I'll follow son and sire, and serve 'em both.

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