The poetical works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 2

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Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1596
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The volume was published in 1855--the copyright date is unmistakable.

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Page 256 - Upon the pillours of eternity, That is contrayr to Mutabilitie : For all that moveth doth in change delight: But thence-forth all shall rest eternally With Him that is the God of Sabbaoth hight: O that great Sabbaoth God graunt me that Sabaoths sight!
Page 235 - For from the golden age, that first was named, It's now at earst become a stonie one ; And men themselves, the which at first were framed Of earthly mould, and form'd of flesh and bone, Are now transformed into hardest stone...
Page 251 - Yet is he nought but parting of the breath; Ne ought to see, but like a shade to weene, Unbodied, unsoul'd, unheard, unseene...
Page 254 - Then since within this wide great universe Nothing doth firme and permanent appeare, But all things tost and turned by transverse: What then should let, but I aloft should reare My trophee, and from all the triumph beare? Now...
Page 13 - And all within, the riven walls were hung With ragged monuments of times forepast, All which the sad effects of discord sung...
Page 6 - OF Court, it seemes, men Courtesie doe call, For that it there most useth to abound ; And well beseemeth that in princes hall That vertue should be plentifully found, Which of all goodly manners is the ground, And roote of civill conversation...
Page 154 - It is the mynd that maketh good or ill, That maketh wretch or happie, rich or poore; For some, that hath abundance at his will, Hath not enough, but wants in greatest store, And other, that hath...
Page 3 - The waies, through which my weary steps I guyde, In this delightfull land of Faery, Are so exceeding spacious and wyde, And sprinckled with such sweet variety, Of all that pleasant is to eare or eye...
Page 167 - But, soone as he appeared to their vew, They vanisht all away out of his sight, And cleane were gone, which way he never knew; All save the Shepheard, who, for fell despight Of that displeasure, broke his bag-pipe quight, And made great mone for that unhappy turne : But Calidore, though no lesse sory wight For that mishap, yet seeing him to mourne, Drew neare, that he the truth of all by him mote learne...
Page 153 - Whylest thus he talkt, the knight with greedy eare Hong still upon his melting mouth attent; Whose sensefull words empierst his hart so neare, That he was rapt with double ravishment, Both of his speach, that wrought him great content, And also of the...

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