The Princess and Curdie

Front Cover
Grosset & Dunlap, 1908 - Kings and rulers - 304 pages
4 Reviews
A miner's son is entrusted with the weighty task of saving the king, the princess, and consequently the kingdom. He is directed in his efforts by a mysterious fairy queen who provides monstrous but gentle creatures to aid him.
 

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I definitely recommend George MacDonald!

User Review  - Lucy - Christianbook.com

The Princess and Curdie, sequel to The Princess and the Goblin, is a wonderful book by George MacDonald. It encompasses and depicts important qualities and character traits that we all should possess ... Read full review

Review: The Princess and Curdie

User Review  - Kristen - Christianbook.com

Though less well-known than its predecessor, The Princess and the Goblin, this book is another true gem from a great writer. I especially enjoy seeing Irene's change from a sweet, but rather babyish ... Read full review

Contents

I
11
II
21
III
32
IV
50
V
57
VI
64
VII
71
VIII
82
XIX
177
XX
189
XXI
198
XXII
205
XXIII
215
XXIV
224
XXV
234
XXVI
242

IX
104
X
111
XI
117
XII
124
XIII
129
XIV
139
XV
147
XVI
154
XVII
163
XVIII
171
XXVII
252
XXVIII
261
XXIX
269
XXX
274
XXXI
277
XXXII
283
XXXIII
291
XXXIV
297
XXXV
302
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 305 - One day at noon, when life was at its highest, the whole city fell with a roaring crash. The cries of men and the shrieks of women went up with its dust, and then there was a great silence.
Page 89 - But this is something like the words of its song: The stars are spinning their threads, And the clouds are the dust that flies, And the suns are weaving them up For the time when the sleepers shall rise. The ocean in music rolls, And gems are turning to eyes, And the trees are gathering souls For the day when the sleepers shall rise. The weepers are learning to smile. And laughter to glean the sighs; Burn and bury the care and guile, For the day when the sleepers shall rise. Oh the dews and the moths...
Page 78 - For instance, if a thief were to come in here just now, he would think he saw the demon of the mine, all in green flames, come to protect her treasure, and would run like a hunted wild goat. I should be all the same, but his evil eyes would see me as I was not.
Page 96 - Now here is what the rose-fire has done for you: it has made your hands so knowing and wise, it has brought your real hands so near the outside of your flesh-gloves, that you will henceforth be able to know at once the hand of a man who is growing into a beast...
Page 25 - There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others; in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection . . . the child is not meant to die, but to be forever f reshborn.
Page 264 - ... of the original self. To be just and friendly was to build the warmest and safest of all nests, and to be kind and loving was to line it with the softest of all furs and feathers, for the one precious, comfortloving self there to lie, revelling in downiest bliss. One of the laws therefore most binding upon men because of its relation to the first and greatest of all duties, was embodied in the Proverb he had just read; and what stronger proof of its wisdom and truth could they desire than the...
Page 250 - They were bespattered with the dirt of their own neglect ; they were soused in the stinking water that had boiled greens; they were smeared with rancid dripping; their faces were rubbed in maggots: I dare not tell all that was done to them.
Page 304 - Irene and Curdie were married. The old king died, and they were king and queen. As long as they lived Gwyntystorm was a better city, and good people grew in it. But they had no children, and when they died the people chose a king.
Page 74 - The lovely lady laughed, and her laugh was a lightning of delight in their souls. " Yes," she went on, " you have got to thank me that you are so poor, Peter. I have seen to that, and it has done well for both you and me, my friend. Things come to the poor that can't get in at the door of the rich. Their money somehow blocks it up.
Page 305 - But still the king went on mining, and coining gold by the pailful, until the people were worse even than in the old time. And so greedy was the king after gold, that when at last the ore began to fail, he caused the miners to reduce the pillars which Peter and they that followed him had left standing to bear the city. And from the girth of an oak of a thousand years, they chipped them down to that of a fir tree of fifty. One day at noon, when life was at its highest, the whole city fell with a roaring...

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