The Principles of Salesmanship, Deportment and System: A Text-book for Department Store Service, Designed as a Manual for Use in the Class Room, for Home Study, and for Reference

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G. W. Jacobs, 1907 - Department stores - 380 pages
 

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Page 217 - Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all, — To thine...
Page 187 - To say that it is possible to persuade without speaking to the passions, is but at best a kind of specious nonsense. The coolest reasoner always in persuading addresseth himself to the passions some way or other. This he cannot avoid doing, if he speak to the purpose.
Page 16 - This Nation never stood in greater need than now of having among its leaders men of lofty ideals, which they try to live up to and not merely to talk of. We need men with these ideals in public life, and we need them just as much in business and in such a profession as the law.
Page 187 - To make me believe, it is not enough to show me that things are so ; to make me act, it is necessary to show that the action will answer some end. That can never be an end to me, which gratifies no passion or affection in my nature. You assure me it is for my honor ; now you solicit my pride, without which I had never been able to understand the word. You say it is for my interest; now yon bespeak my self-love. It is for the public good; now you rouse my patriotism. It will relieve the miserable...
Page 187 - Now you solicit my pride, without which I had never been able to understand the word. You say, ' It is for my interest.' Now you bespeak my self-love.
Page 51 - France, where the rewards paid for first-class scholarly achievement are as much above those paid in this country as our rewards for first-class achievement in industry or law are above those paid abroad. But of course what counts infinitely more than any possible outside reward is the spirit of the worker himself. The prime need is to instil into the minds of the scholars themselves a true appreciation of real as distinguished from sham success. In productive scholarship, in the scholarship which...
Page 215 - In the exact sciences, at least," says Cuvier, "it is the patience of a sound intellect, when invincible, which truly constitutes genius." And Chesterfield has also observed that "the power of applying an attention, steady and undissipated, to a single object, is the sure mark of a superior genius.
Page 187 - The coolest reasoner always in persuading addresseth himself to the passions some way or other. This he cannot avoid doing, if he speak to the purpose. To make me believe it is enough to show me that things are so ; to make me act, it is necessary to show that the action will answer some end.
Page 57 - The greed for gain and the greed for power have blinded men to the timeold distinction between right and wrong. Both among business men and at the bar are to be found advisers, counted shrewd and successful, who have substituted the penal code for the moral law as the standard of conduct. Right and wrong have given way to the subtler distinction between legal, notillegal, and illegal; or better, perhaps, between honest, law-honest, and dishonest.
Page 57 - This university and all universities, in season and out of season, must keep clearly in view before themselves and the public the real meaning of character, and they must never tire of preaching that character and character alone makes knowledge, skill, and wealth a help rather than a harm to those who possess them and to the community as a whole.

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