The Principles of Wind-band Transcription

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C. Fischer, 1921 - Arrangement (Music) - 135 pages
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Page 8 - ... to those smaller vibrations, and which we' have agreed to call overtones, mingling at the same time with the fundamental tone of the string. The addition of these overtones to the fundamental tone determines the timbre or quality of the sound, or, as we have agreed to call it, the clang-tint. It is the addition of such overtones to fundamental tones of the same pitch which enables us to distinguish the sound of a clarionet from that of a flute, and the sound of a violin from both.
Page 91 - ... utter our impressions and desires. The complex musical phrases by which composers have conveyed complex emotions, may rationally be supposed to have influenced us in making those involved cadences of conversation by which we convey our subtler thoughts and feelings. That the cultivation of music has no effect on the mind, few will be absurd enough to contend. And if it has an effect, what more natural effect is there than this of developing our perception of the meanings of inflections, qualities,...
Page 36 - ... coherence, no unity between the individual members of the group ; in one case keys, in another valves ; a small compass, an imperfect scale, lack of accurate intonation throughout, bad quality of tone, variations of fingering requiring fresh study in passing from one instrument to another. The keyed bugle, built on false proportions, offered no prospect of improvement ; the mechanism of the valves themselves, by their abrupt angles, deteriorated the quality of tone ; and the absence of intermediate...
Page 95 - The quality of tone of the trumpet is noble and brilliant ; it suits with warlike ideas, with cries of fury and of vengeance, as with songs of triumph ; it lends itself to the expression of all energetic, lofty, and grand sentiments, and to the majority of tragic accents.
Page 8 - ... clang-tint. It is the addition of such overtones to fundamental tones of the same pitch which enables us to distinguish the sound of a clarionet from that of a flute, and the sound of a violin from both. Could the pure fundamental tones of these instruments be detached, they would be undistinguishable from each other ; but the different admixture of overtones in the different instruments renders their clang-tints diverse, and therefore distinguishable. Instead of the heavy india-rubber tube in...
Page 8 - When a string vibrates as a whole, it usually divides at the same time into its aliquot parts. Smaller vibrations are superposed upon the larger, the tones corresponding to those smaller vibrations, and which we have agreed to call overtones, mingling at the same time with the fundamental tone of the string.
Page 93 - ... to speak, to confirm what nature prepares-r-in fact, what is induced by the generator. As light comprises all the colours and every gradation between each colour and the next, but yet seems spotless, so every musical sound comprises all other sounds, but yet seems to be one single note ; the blue, or the red, or the yellow, or any other ray is separated from its prismatic brotherhood and seems then a complete and independent object to the vision, and so any sound is separated from the harmonic...
Page 114 - It may not be out of place to call attention, at this point, to several relatively recent street car franchises1 based on the so-called principle of cost of service.
Page 136 - A reference book for all wind instrument players describing the construction and maintenance of bands, their organization, instrumentation, and all other complete information that is necessary or desirable.
Page 90 - ... proceeds, then, by musical intervals, precisely as a man walks with separate, firm, and decided steps. It seems that it is in its movement by intervals and by rhythmic steps, as also by the different shades of piano and forte, crescendo and diminuendo, accelerando and rallantando, of legato and staccato, which constitute musical accent, that the secret of the great impression which music makes upon the human heart resides. It has thus very varied means of completely adapting itself to the psychological...

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