The Problem of Vocational Education

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Houghton Mifflin, 1910 - Education - 85 pages
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Page 81 - ... changes of the age. Rightly organized, vocational education will prove a profitable investment for society. The pedagogy of this education will differ widely from that evolved for liberal education, and especially in respect to making practice, or participation in productive work, a fundamental element. Vocational education must be so conducted as to contribute to the making of the citizen, as well as the worker. In the course of the development of a progressive social economy, we may expect...
Page 8 - What is Vocational Education ? In vocational education, the choice of materials and methods is primarily determined by the necessities of some of the numerous callings or groups of related callings, into which the workers of the world have divided themselves. That vocational education which is specialized to the preparation of lawyers, physicians, and teachers, we call professional ; that which is designed to train the bookkeeper, clerk, stenographer, or...
Page v - ... demands of our intricate social life, the problem of moral 'education becomes conspicuous in the schools. As the work and play of the children under the conditions of city life become restricted so as to deprive them of robust physical activities in the fresh air and sunshine, the school is called upon to combat the danger with systematic physical training. As factory and shop employment becomes specialized and scientific, and the system of apprenticeship fails to make good workmen, the obligation...
Page iv - ... the press has more influence ; libraries are more plentiful ; and the school has grown to be a modern giant where once it was a puny babe. The same old institutional forces beat upon the nervous systems of men, but the relative distribution of their work has changed, and is changing.
Page iv - In all these variations of influence, one striking tendency stands out clearly: as the agencies for incidental and informal education become incapable of training men for their complex environment, society, becoming increasingly self-conscious, gathers up the neglected functions and assigns them to the school. As church and family life ceases to keep pace with the moral demands of our intricate social life, the problem of moral education becomes conspicuous in the schools. As the work and play of...
Page 17 - ... States, only the lower forms succeed, owing to absence of skilled labor. American manufacturers do not choose unskilled labor, but have been compelled, in many instances, to adapt themselves to it, wasteful and unsatisfactory though the process may be. The evidence that the old agencies of vocational education — the home, the shop, and other means of participation in productive industry — are no longer sufficient, could be multiplied. It is one of the certain social facts of our age. There...
Page 81 - Snedden says: of liberalizing the minds of several types of l>oys and girls, and especially those least capable of abstract thinking or school idealism. The demand for vocational education under school conditions is a widespread one and is rooted In the social and economic changes of the age. Rightly organized vocational education will prove a profitable investment for society. There is in this country what is known as the National Educational Association. At its national convention held in Cleveland,...
Page 13 - The most successful schools that grew up to meet this need were those 12 which offered both liberal and vocational education, and in a sense made the latter the groundwork for the former. In the best negro schools of the South to-day, one will find many vocations taught in a very practical and effective manner, and it is generally conceded that the social effects of this training are genuinely worth while.
Page 47 - It has been pointed out in the report of the Douglas Commission (of Massachusetts), as well as elsewhere, that the period from fourteen to sixteen is a critical one in the vocational development of large numbers of children. This is the period when economic necessity or ambition tempts children into callings which are temporarily quite remunerative (in a relative sense for these children), but which are essentially noneducative.
Page 52 - ... wage earners at from 14 to 16 years of age; that they continue as such for from 5 to 8 years, after which they marry and, if conditions are at all prosperous, they devote themselves henceforth to home making. Only under economic conditions of severe stress is it necessary that a woman who must care for children is obliged also to supplement that responsibility with work outside the home ; and this is a condition which It must be the aim of social effort to disapprove, and reduce where possible....

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