The Psychology of Peacekeeping

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1998 - Political Science - 261 pages
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Langholtz examines how psychology and other social sciences can offer both theoretical explanations and practical applications in the resolution and amelioration of potentially violent international conflicts. Since the end of the Cold War and bipolar ideologies, the international community has been willing to intervene using approaches that are founded as much in psychology as in force and these remedies have not been confined to the violent periods of conflicts. This book examines psychological interventions and issues during three phases of conflicts. First, the book examines measures available in advance of a threatening conflict through early intervention and an examination of ethnopolitical issues, economic problems, and potential diplomatic solutions. Second, psychological facets of peacekeeping are examined: the selection of peacekeepers, psychological ambiguities of peacekeeping, and the numbing that comes with widespread suffering. Finally the book examines the psychological measures available to strengthen a cease-fire, deal with mines and related after-effects of war, encourage reconciliation, and hasten the return to a stable and durable peace.

 

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Contents

Prevention Psychological and Social Issues That Can Avert or Lead to War
1
The Evolving Psychology of Peacekeeping
3
Peace through Economic and Social Development
17
Early Intervention Prediction and Action
31
The Psychology of Diplomacy Conflict Resolution in a Time of Minimal or Unusual SmallScale Conflicts
41
Cultural and Ethnic Issues of Conflict and Peacekeeping
57
Psychological Considerations during Periods of Conflict
73
Insensitivity to the Value of Human Life A Study of Psychophysical Numbing
75
Humanitarian Intervention Psychosocial Assistance and Peacekeeping
131
Peacekeeping and the Psychology of Conflict Resolution
153
Creating a Durable Peace Psychological Aspects of Rebuilding and Reforming the Indigenous Criminal Justice System
167
The Psychological Consequences of Mines Left Behind Following a Conflict
179
Postconflict Peacebuilding and Making Efforts Count Reconstruction Elections and Beyond
195
Forgiveness Reconciliation and the Contribution of International Peacekeeping
207
The Peace Process at Its Culmination The Reconciliation Elections
223
Treating the New World Disorder
239

Personnel Selection Preparation and Training for UN Peacekeeping Missions
89
Psychological Aspects of Peacekeeping on the Ground
101
Psychological Ambiguities in Peacekeeping
111
Psychological Aspects and ConfidenceBuilding Measures in the Transition from Violence to a Durable Peace
129
Index
255
About the Editor and Contributors
259
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About the author (1998)

HARVEY J. LANGHOLTZ is Assistant Professor of Psychology at The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. /e He has served as a member of the United States Delegation to the United Nations and has been appointed a Senior Special Fellow of the United Nations Institute for Training and Research.

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