The Revenge of Gaia: Why the Earth is Fighting Back - and how We Can Still Save Humanity

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Allen Lane, 2006 - Biology - 176 pages
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Lovelock’s unique authority and original perspective sets this book apart from other books on environmental change. He speaks as a “planetary physician” with more than forty years’ experience of thinking about how to respond to the Earth’s needs as a living organism. Illustrated with examples drawn from his experiences around the world, Lovelock draws many radical conclusions, most controversially a passionate advocacy of nuclear energy. This, he argues, is not only a secure, safe and reliable source of energy but also the only way to counter the lethal heat waves and rising sea levels which will increasingly threaten civilisations. Lovelock argues that the only way for humankind to come to terms with Gaia now, and have a chance of surviving, is to embrace science and technology, not reject them. This is his passionate manifesto of how to do that and so lessen our impact on the Earth before it is too late.

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Contents

What is Gaia?
15
The Life History of Gaia
39
Sources of Energy
66
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

James Lovelock is the author of more than 200 scientific papers and the originator of the Gaia Hypothesis (now Gaia Theory). He has written three books on the subject: Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth, The Ages of Gaia and Gaia: The Practical Science of Planetary Medicine, as well as an autobiography, Homage to Gaia. He has been a Fellow of the Royal Society since 1974. Since 1961 he has worked as a wholly independent scientist but retained links with universities in the UK and the USA, and since 1994 has been an Honourary Visiting Fellow of the Green College, University of Oxford. He has been described as 'one of the great thinkers of our time' (New Scientist) and 'one of the environmental movement's most influential figures' (Observer). In 2003 he was made a Companion of Honour by Her Majesty the Queen, and in September 2005 Prospect magazine named him as one of the world's top 100 global public intellectuals.

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