The Revolt of the Angels

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Modern Library, 1914 - English fiction - 348 pages
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Contents

I
7
II
15
III
25
IV
33
V
37
VI
49
VII
54
VIII
63
XIX
181
XX
189
XXI
202
XXII
216
XXIII
227
XXIV
234
XXV
238
XXVI
246

IX
74
X
79
XI
91
XII
100
XIII
109
XIV
118
XV
131
XVI
141
XVII
156
XVIII
164
XXVII
256
XXVIII
268
XXIX
273
XXX
281
XXXI
294
XXXII
303
XXXIII
314
XXXIV
322
XXXV
337
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Page 345 - It is Lucifer who yields it to you. Bear it in defense of peace and law." Then, letting his gaze fall on the leaders of the celestial cohorts, he cried in a ringing voice: "Archangel Michael, and you, Powers, Thrones, and Dominations, swear all of you to be faithful to your God." "We swear it," they replied with one voice. And Satan said : "Powers, Thrones, and Dominations, of all past wars, I wish but to remember the invincible courage that you displayed and the loyalty which you rendered to authority,...
Page 345 - ... entrust my Spouse. Watch over her faithfully. In thee I confirm the right and power to decide matters of doctrine, to regulate the use of the sacraments, to make laws and to uphold purity of morals. And the faithful shall be under obligation to conform thereto. My Church is eternal, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. Thou art infallible. Nothing is changed." And the successor of the apostles felt flooded with rapture. He prostrated himself, and with his forehead touching the...
Page 263 - I freely acknowledge that it is almost impossible systematically to constitute a natural moral law. Nature has no principles. She furnishes us with no reason to believe that human life is to be respected. Nature, in her indifference, makes no distinction between good and evil.
Page 311 - I argue, like you, in the language of human beings. And what is human language but the cry of the beasts of the forests or the mountains, complicated and corrupted by arrogant anthropoids. How then, Zita, can one be expected to argue well with a collection of angry or plaintive sounds like that? Angels do not reason at all; men, being superior to the angels, reason imperfectly. I will not mention the professors who think to define the absolute with the aid of cries that they have inherited from the...
Page 347 - War engenders war, and victory defeat. God, conquered, will become Satan; Satan, conquering, will become God. May the fates spare me this terrible lot!
Page 29 - And this painful truth was suddenly borne in upon the mind of Monsieur Sariette: to wit, that the most scientific system of numbering will not help to find a book if the book is no longer in its place.
Page 11 - Maurice, ttte elder, lived in a little pavilion comprising two rooms at the bottom of the garden. The young man thus gained a freedom which enabled him to endure family life. He was rather good-looking, smart without too much pretence, and the faint smile which merely raised one corner of his mouth did not lack charm. At twenty-five Maurice possessed the wisdom of Ecclesiastes. Doubting whether a man hath any profit of all his labour which he ,-J, taketh under the sun he never put himself out about...
Page 348 - Nectaire, you fought with me before the birth of the world. We were conquered because we failed to understand that Victory is a spirit, and that it is in ourselves and in ourselves alone that we must attack and destroy laldabaoth.
Page 43 - ... burdening the flock of Christ. ... It will be found that it is our ambition, our avarice, our cupidity which have wrought all these evils on the people of God, and that it is because of these sins that shepherds are being driven from their churches, and the churches starved of the Word of God, and the property of the church, which is the property of the poor, stolen, and the priesthood given to the unworthy.
Page 78 - Stay still,' said Maurice, holding her back in his arms. In his present mood, had the sky fallen it would not have troubled him. But in one bound she escaped from him. Crouching down, her eyes filled with terror, she was pointing with her finger at a figure which appeared in a corner of the room, between the fire-place and the wardrobe with the mirror.