The Roofing, Cornice and Skylight Manual: Practical Articles on Laying Flat and Standing Seam Roofing, Cornice Shop Practice and Skylight Construction

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David Williams, 1901 - Architecture - 175 pages
 

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Page 30 - ... which avoids the buckling caused by rolling and transportation from the shop to the job. After the necessary strips have been prepared they are bent up with the roofing tongs, or, what is better and quicker, the roofing edger for standing-seam roofing. This is a machine into which the strips of tin are fed, being discharged in the required bent form shown at A or B in Fig. 221, bent up 1 inch on one side and 1J inches on the other side. Or the machine will, if Fig
Page 28 - It is forged to a wedge shape, about 1 inch wide and } inch Fig. 212. thick at the end, and is tinned on one side and the end only; if tinned otherwise, the solder, instead of remaining on the tinned side when soldering, would flow downward; by having the soldering copper tinned on one side only, the remaining sides are black and do not tend to draw the solder downward.
Page 98 - JL of the elevation, as shown by the small figures, and draw the usual measuring lines, which intersect with lines of corresponding numbers drawn from the intersections on the miter lines VP and RA, at right angles to P R. A line traced through these intersections, as shown by W and Z' X', will be the required pattern for the front of head shown in plan view by 3'.
Page 29 - ... across it to strengthen the same. In using the soldering copper. it should be held in the position shown by C, which allows the solder to flow forward and into the seam, while if the copper were held as shown by D, the solder would flow backward and away from the seam. In "soaking" the seam with solder the copper should be placed directly over the lapped part, so that the metal gets thoroughly heated and draws the solder between the joint. It makes no difference where this cross joint occurs;...
Page 28 - ... about 1 inch wide and J inch Fig. 212. thick at the end, and is tinned on one side and the end only; if tinned otherwise, the solder, instead of remaining on the tinned side when soldering, would flow downward; by having the soldering copper tinned on one side only, the remaining sides are black and do not tend to draw the solder downward. The soldering copper being thus prepared, the upright seam, shown in Fig. 213, where the sheet B overlaps the sheet A 1", is soldered by first tacking the...
Page 17 - ... expansion and contraction of the metal. The closer these cleats are placed, the firmer the roof will be and the better the seams will hold. By using fewer cleats, time may be saved in laying the roof, but double this time is lost when soldering the seams, for the heat of the soldering copper Fig. 209. will raise the seams, causing a succession of buckles, which retard soldering and require 10 per cent more solder. When the seams are nailed or cleated close it lays flat and smooth and the soldering...
Page 97 - With this exception, the rate of infection increased in both males and females from A to B, B to C, and C to D, the females hi A and C, but not in B, showing a higher rate than the corresponding males.
Page 30 - Figs. 220 to 229 inclusive. Assume that 14 x 20-inch sheets are used and the sheets are edged on the 20-inch sides only, as shown by A in Fig. 220, making the sheet 13 x 20 inches. After the required number of sheets have been edged, and assuming...
Page 66 - D1 in plan, or twice the amount of D in elevation, as shown by similar figures on the stretchout line F E. At right angles to FE and through these small figures, draw lines which intersect with lines drawn at right angles to the lines of the small cylinder from similarly numbered intersections in the miter line in elevation. Trace a line through the points thus obtained; EFG will be the development for the cylinder C.
Page 20 - If the paint is applied to the rosin, the latter, with time, will crack, and the rain will soak under the cracked rosin to the tin surface. Even when the surface of the roof is dry, by raising the cracked rosin, moisture will often be found underneath, which naturally tends to rust the plate more and more with each storm. If the rosin is removed, the entire tin surface is protected by paint.

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