The sandman: a game of you

Front Cover
DC Comics, 1993 - Comics & Graphic Novels - 185 pages
An attempt to summon and imprison Death, results, instead, in the capture of Morpheus, the Sandman, who must regain the tools of his powers.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - elenchus - www.librarything.com

SYNOPSIS | Rose's search for brother Jed leads to a confrontation between Dreamtime factions which went rogue in Morpheus's absence. The consequences are larger than either the Corinthian or Brute ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - schufman - www.librarything.com

What a wild, dark and interesting ride. I can see why it comes so highly recommended. Great initiation of what I am sure will continue to be a fantastic story. Not for the faint of heart. Read full review

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Contents

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About the author (1993)

Neil Gaiman was born in Portchester, England on November 10, 1960. He worked as a journalist and freelance writer for a time, before deciding to try his hand at comic books. Some of his work has appeared in publications such as Time Out, The Sunday Times, Punch and The Observer. His first comic endeavor was the graphic novel series The Sandman. It is the comic book he is most famous for and the series has won every major industry award, including 9 Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, 3 Harvey Awards, and the 1991 World Fantasy Award for best short story, making it the first comic ever to win a literary award. He writes both children and adult books. His adult books include Stardust, which won the Mythopoeic Award as best novel for adults in 1999; American Gods, which won the Hugo, Nebula, Bram Stoker, SFX, and Locus awards; and Anansi Boys. His children's books include The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish; Coraline, which won the Elizabeth Burr/Worzalla, the BSFA, the Hugo, the Nebula, and the Bram Stoker awards; The Wolves in the Walls; and The Graveyard Book, which won the Newbery Award in 2009. He also co-wrote Good Omens with Terry Pratchett. He is currently working on making a film of one of his early books, Neverwhere.