The science of government, founded on natural law

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Dean & Trevett, 1841 - History - 113 pages
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Page 42 - Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that. You take my house, when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house ; you take my life, When you do take the means whereby I live.
Page 111 - I was an hungered, and ye gave me meat; thirsty, and ye gave me drink. I was a stranger, and ye took me in; naked, and ye clothed me. I was sick, and ye visited me. I was in prison, and ye came unto me.
Page 39 - ... the whole : making it a rule to keep its discounts within its income. The operation proceeds thus : by issuing no new notes, but requiring something from your debtors, you oblige them to return to you the Bank notes you lent them, or their equivalents.
Page 39 - The reader can too easily divine the nature of this power, for it is now grinding America as well as England in the dust. It is the banking system, and its leader in this country has acknowledged, that by it alone, he and his class had the power to " make men willing to make sacrifices."* It is done simply by lending and withdrawing at certain times and places, and * Biddle's letter published in Gouge's History of Banking.
Page 111 - ... in prison, and ye ministered unto me; and inasmuch as ye did it to one of the least of these my brethren, ye did it unto me.
Page 39 - Bank notes you lent them, or their equivalents. This makes the Bank notes scarcer — this makes them more valuable — this makes the goods for which they are generally exchanged less valuable — the debtor, in his anxiety to get your notes, being willing to sell his goods at a sacrifice — this brings down the prices of goods, and makes every thing cheaper. Then the remedy begins. The foreigner, finding that his goods must be sold so low, sends no more. The American importer, finding that he...
Page 6 - Whose passions not his masters are ; Whose soul is still prepared for death ; Not tied unto the world with care Of prince's ear or vulgar breath...
Page 16 - Fashions which worship crosses, stars and garters, which are given to such as ravage and destroy, with fire and sword, the territories of the peaceful husbandman and civil citizen, have been brought to bear against us. The great banker, like the robber by the sword, men consider good society, while the honest man of value to his fellow men, is held as base, ignoble, vulgar, and looked down upon with scorn.
Page 62 - It consists of two parts. The tariff, to encourage manufacturers by raising the prices of foreign goods so high when brought to our markets that the domestic may be preferred as cheaper ; and the banking system, to afford facilities to trade. But by the issue of paper money from the banks, prices are raised, and domestic manufactures are to a great extent neglected for the foreign articles, and no increase of the tariff, as experience has proved,can protect domestic productions, while the banks may...
Page 17 - ... in our favor. I turn to them and turn away, and back to them again, since they make most pretensions of good will to man, but it is all a show. They too are striving to escape that hydra, want, and seek the glory of the world, and dare not speak against the great accumulator. In view of all we thus behold, does not the dreadful thought come home to our understandings, that there is no God of justice to order things aright on earth; if there be a God, he is a malicious and revengeful being, who...

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