The Science of Swimming: As Taught and Practiced in Civilized and Savage Nations, with Particular Instruction to Learners : Also Showing Its Importance in the Preservation of Health and Life

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Fowlers and Wells, 1849 - Swimming - 36 pages
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Page 13 - First, that, though the legs, arms, and head of a human body, being solid parts, are specifically somewhat heavier than fresh water, yet the trunk, particularly the upper part, from its hollowness, is so much lighter than water, as that the whole of the body, taken together, is too light to sink wholly under water; but some part will remain above, until the lungs become filled with water ; which happens...
Page 14 - I was drawn along the surface of the water in a very agreeable manner. Having then engaged another boy to carry my clothes round the pond, to a place which I pointed out to him on the other side, I began to cross...
Page 14 - When I was a boy, I amused myself one day with flying a paper kite; and, approaching the bank of a pond which was near a mile broad, I tied the string to a stake, and the kite ascended to a very considerable height above the pond, while I was swimming. In a little time, being desirous of amusing myself with my kite, and enjoying at the same time the pleasure of swimming, I returned; and...
Page 13 - The body continuing suspended as before, and upright, if the head be leaned quite back, so that the face looks upwards, all the back part of the head being then under water, and its weight consequently in a great measure supported by it, the face will remain above water quite free for breathing, will rise an inch higher every inspiration, and sink as much every expiration, but never so low as that the water may come over the mouth.
Page 14 - During the great heats in summer there is no danger in bathing, however warm we may be, in rivers which have been thoroughly warmed by the sun. But to throw one's self into cold spring water, when the body has been heated by exercise in the sun, is an imprudence which may prove fatal. I once knew an instance of four young men, who, having...
Page 12 - ... yourself towards the egg, and endeavouring by the action of your hands and feet against the water to get forward till within reach of it...
Page 13 - ... water, reach above the mouth and nostrils, perhaps a little above the eyes, so that a man cannot long remain suspended in water, with his head in that position. The body continuing suspended as before, and upright, if the head...
Page 12 - Possibly they may be of service in supporting the body while you are learning what is called the stroke, or that manner of drawing in and striking out the hands and feet that is necessary to produce progressive motion. But...
Page 14 - The exercise of swimming is one of the most healthy and agreeable in the world. After having swam for an hour or two in the evening, one sleeps coolly the whole night, even during the most ardent heat of summer. Perhaps the pores being cleansed* the insensible perspiration increases and occasions this coolness...
Page 19 - India-rubber and corkshavings, in the form of jackets, belts, &c., which may be used like the corks and bladders ; but, as their bulk is generally all around the chest, they hinder the free use of the arms and impede the velocity of motion. As life-preservers they, would do very well if people ever had them on when they were needed, or had presence of mind enough to fit and inflate them in sudden emergencies. The best life-preservers are the self-reliance and well-directed skill of a good swimmer....

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