The Self in Social Psychology

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Psychology Press, 1999 - Psychology - 492 pages
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The study of self has been one of the most exciting and important areas of social psychology over the past several decades. This reader presents an elite collection of the most important and influential articles on the topic. The selection was based on a lengthy poll of the entire membership of the International Society for Self and Identity, in which hundreds of articles were rated for possible inclusion and the highest rated ones were chosen for inclusion, along with some of the field's most recent work to balance the coverage.
The volume begins with an original introduction by Roy Baumeister which provides an overview of the study of the self. The readings themselves are then organized into ten thematic sections covering core topics such as self-knowledge, self-esteem, self-regulation, self-presentation, and the self and culture. Each section has an introduction that describes other relevant work, in order to place the selection in its full intellectual context. Sections also include annotated suggestions for further reading to guide further study, and discussion questions.
 

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Contents

P A R T
3
P A R T
6
P A R T
9
SelfKnowledge
21
READING 2
40
P A R T 2
67
Motivational Roots
85
READING5
103
P A R T 7
281
READING 15
299
READING 4
315
P A R T 8
337
Motivation and SelfKnowledge
369
READING 19
382
The CognitiveAffective Crossfire When SelfConsistency Confronts
391
READING20
402

P A R T 4
119
READING 8
134
READING 9
150
P A R T 5
177
READING 11
195
SelfEsteem
219
READING 13
240
P A R T 10
427
READING22
436
READING23
446
Appendix How to Read a Journal Article in Social Psychology
461
Author Index
471
Subject Index
487
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About the author (1999)

Roy F. Baumeister is the Eppes Eminent Professor of Psychology and head of the social psychology graduate program at Florida State University. He received his Ph.D. in social psychology from Princeton in 1978 and did a postdoctoral fellowship in sociology at the University of California at Berkeley. Baumeister has worked at Case Western Reserve University, as well as the University of Texas, University of Virginia, Max-Planck-Institute, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Baumeister's has received research grants from the National Institutes of Health and from the Templeton Foundation. His research spans the areas of self and identity, self-regulation, interpersonal rejection and the need to belong, sexuality and gender, aggression, self-esteem, meaning, and self-presentation. He is the author of nearly 400 publications. His books include Evil: Inside Human Violence and Cruelty , The Cultural Animal , Meanings of Life and Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength.

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