The Seven Laws of Teaching

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Congregational Sunday-school and publishing society, 1886 - Teaching - 144 pages
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Good, clear message.

User Review  - Ann Wilensky - Christianbook.com

It is fitting that a book that instructs teaching should also be a good, clear and useful book. A must for anyone who teaches and for those who like to learn. Read full review

User Review  - Jessica Taylor - Christianbook.com

I have a degree in early childhood education and was amazed by this book. I wanted to study on how to teach an adult Bible class and Mr. Gregory lays it out very simply and biblically on the ways to be effective in teaching others. Read full review

Contents

I
v
II
11
III
24
IV
44
V
61
VII
77
VIII
101
IX
114
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Page 3 - REVIEW, reproducing correctly the old, deepening its impression with new thought, correcting false views, and completing the true. These rules and the laws which they outline, underlie and govern all successful teaching. If taken in their broadest meaning, nothing need be added to them ; nothing can be safely taken away. No one who will thoroughly master and use them need fail as a teacher, provided he will also maintain the good order which is necessary to give them free and undisturbed action....
Page 2 - Teaching is AROUSING and USING the pupils mind to form in it a desired conception or thought. 6. Learning is THINKING into one's own UNDERSTANDING a new idea or truth. 7. The test and proof of teaching done — the finishing and fastening process — must be a RE-VIEWING, RETHINKING, RE-KNOWING, and RE-PRODUCING of the knowledge taught.
Page 5 - They catch by intuition the secret of success, and do by a sort of instinct what others do by rule and reflection. A careful study of their methods would show how 'Closely they follow these principles ; and if there is any exception it is in the cases in which their wonderful practical mastery of some of these rules — usually the first three — allows them to give slighter heed to the others. To those who do not belong to this class of "natural teachers," the knowledge of these laws is of vital...
Page 4 - They cover all teaching of all subjects and in all grades, since they are the fundamental conditions on which ideas may be made to pass from one mind to another. They are as valid and useful for the college professor as for the master of a common school ; for the teaching of a Bible truth as for instruction in arithmetic. In proportion as the truth to be communicated is high and difficult to be understood, or as the...
Page 2 - ... teaching. Addressed to the teacher, they may read as follows : — • I. Know thoroughly and familiarly the lesson you wish to teach ; or, in other words, teach from ' a full mind and a clear understanding. II. Gain and keep the attention and interest of the pupils upon the lesson. Refuse to teach without attention. III. Use words understood by both teacher and pupil in the same sense — • language clear and vivid alike to both. IV. Begin with what is already well known to the pupil in the...
Page 3 - Keep his thoughts as much as possible ahead of your expression, making him a discoverer of truth. VI. Require the pupil to reproduce in thought the lesson he is learning — thinking it out in its parts, proofs, connections, and applications till he can express it in his own language. VII. Review, review, REVIEW, reproducing correctly the old, deepening its impressions with new thought, correcting false views, and completing the true. These rules and the laws which they outline, 'underlie and govern...
Page 5 - ... professor as for the master of a common school ; for the teaching of a Bible truth as for instruction in arithmetic. In proportion as the truth to be communicated is high and difficult to be understood, or as the pupils to be instructed are young and ignorant, ought these rules to be carefully followed. Doubtless there are many successful teachers who never heard of these laws, and who do not consciously follow them ; just as there are people who walk safely without any knowledge of gravitation,...
Page viii - To discover their laws, let these seven factors be passed again in careful review and enumeration, as follows: (1) a teacher; (2) a learner; (3) a common language or medium of communication; (4) a lesson or truth; (5) the teacher's work; (6) the learner's work; (7) the review work, which ascertains, perfects, and fastens the work done.
Page 6 - To those who do not belong to this class of "natural teachers," the knowledge of these laws is of vital necessity. Let no one fear that a study of the laws of teaching will tend to substitute a cold, mechanical sort of work for the warm-hearted, enthusiastic teaching so often admired and praised. True skill kindles and keeps alive enthusiasm by giving it success where it would otherwise be discouraged by defeat. The true worker's love for his work grows with his ability to do it well. Even enthusiasm...
Page 2 - They lie imbedded in the simplest description that can be given of the seven elements named, as in the following : 1. A teacher must be one who KNOWS the lesson or truth to be taught. 2. A learner is one who ATTENDS with interest to the lesson given. 3. The language used as a MEDIUM between teacher and learner must be COMMON to both. 4. The lesson to be learned must be explicable in the terms of truth already known by the learner, — the UNKNOWN must be explained by the KNOWN. 5. Teaching is AROUSING...

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