The Seven Sons of Mammon: A Story, Volume 1

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Tinsley, 1862
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Page 224 - Nobles and heralds, by your leave, Here lies what once was Matthew Prior, The son of Adam and of Eve ; Can Bourbon or Nassau claim higher ? " But, in this case, the old prejudice got the better of the old joke.
Page 55 - The commissioners shall keep an accurate record and correct minutes or notes of all their proceedings, with the dates thereof, and shall appoint and employ clerks or other persons to assist them in the transaction of the business which may come before them.
Page 264 - How manic manere bestys of venerie there were, Lysten to youre dame, and she shalle you lere : Four maner bestys of venerie there are, — The fyrst of them the harte, the second is the hare ; The boore is one of tho : the wulfe and not one more." only, .Dame Letitia Salusbury would have taken away the " boore" and the " wulfe,
Page 31 - Upon my word," said, in despair, Miss Mirabelle, the duenna of Selina House, Brixton, "if Miss Hill had not had sixty thousand pounds to her fortune, I do believe that the best thing that could have happened to her would have been to be an articled pupil, and turn out a ' trotting governess ;' " by which appellation was meant, I believe, those unhappy females who, collected and resigned, go out daily in rain, or sleet, or snow, to give lessons in middle-class families, and are spoken of by the servant...
Page 274 - I don't think that Bruin is mercenary after all." " No, indeed," quoth Magdalen, half to herself. "Then why not have him. Better to be a curate's wife than a lonely spinster, painting away at those everlasting saints and martyrs with their heads on one side, and worrying yourself about High Church and Low Church and Ernest Goldthorpe, who would be a good fellow enough if he didn't wear swanshot...
Page 179 - A gadding- about mania seized on all ranks and conditions of men. Women went up in droves to London professedly to see the Exhibition — actually to stare at the dresses and bonnets in the shop-windows. Ancient hedgers and ditchers, who had scarcely been familiar with the high-street of their market-town, were put into clean smockfrocks, and paraded by their pastors through the giant metropolis, and the wonderful structure in the park. The very paupers in rural workhouses were dressed...
Page 306 - There is a matter-of-fact reality about the sketches, but they are chiefly remarkable for the moral tone of their reflections. Generally speaking, painters of these subjects rather throw a purple light over the actual scenes, and say nothing of the consequences to which they lead. Mr. Ritchie is ever stripping off the mask of the mock gaiety before him, and pointing the end to which it must finally come."—Spectator. TINSLEY BROTHERS
Page 307 - A RECORD OF THE POLITICS, ART, FASHION, GOSSIP, AND ANECDOTE OF PARIS DURING THE PAST EIGHTEEN MONTHS. BY CHRONIQUEUSE. Author of "Chateau Frissac; or, Home Scenes in France." Just Published, price 5s., ABOUT LONDON. BY J. EWING RITCHIE, Author of

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