The Social Gospel of Jesus: The Kingdom of God in Mediterranean Perspective

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Fortress Press, 2001 - Religion - 178 pages
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Scholars are agreed that the central metaphor in Jesus' proclamation was the kingdom of God. But what did that phrase mean in the first-century Palestinian world of Jesus? Since it is a political metaphor, what did Jesus envision as the political import of his message? Since this is tied to the political economy, how was that structured in Jesus' day? How is the violence of Jesus' Mediterranean world addressed in the kingdom? And how does "self-denial" fit into Jesus' agenda?

Malina tackles these questions in a very accessible way, providing a social-scientific analysis, meaning that he brings to bear explicit models and a comparative approach toward an exciting interpretation of what Jesus was up to, and how his first-century audience would have heard him.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Why Proclaim the Kingdom of God?
15
Mediterranean Violence and the Kingdom
37
Hidden Social Dimensions of the Kingdom
71
The Kingdom and Political Economy
97
The Kingdom and Jesus SelfDenying Followers
113
The Social Gospel of Jesus and Its Outcomes
141
Abbreviations
163
Bibliography
165
Index of Ancient Sources
175
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Bruce J. Malina is Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska.

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